SCHOOL COMMITTEE NEWS Schools To Receive 600K Infusion Of Technology In Next

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — At last week’s meeting, the Wilmington School Committee unanimously approved $605,000 in capital requests for the 2019-2020 school year.The capital requests included:$180,000 for projector & interactive whiteboard replacements at the Middle School$100,000 for a wireless upgrade at the Middle School$100,000 for laptop replacements at the North & West$100,000 for a new datacenter for the district$75,000 for 80 desktops and monitor replacements in the Middle School Tech Labs$30,000 for a PA system upgrade at the six lower schools$20,000 for Chromebook Carts for MCAS testing“The use of technology continues to play a significant role in our schools,” Town Manager Jeff Hull stressed in his recent budget message. “Capital expenditures in the amount of $605,000 are recommended in the upcoming year’s budget to help ensure Wilmington’s students can develop essential skills for the 21st century.”“The 18-year-old Middle School requires an upgrade to its Wi-Fi infrastructure. As use of technology continues to expand, maintaining connectivity is key,” said Hull. “The replacement of projectors and whiteboards is proposed, as the existing projects with be 10 years old in fiscal year 2020 and do not have the level of resolution as compared with current projects.”Hull also noted that the current laptops and desktops at the North and West are at least five years old, while the upgrades to the school system’s data center will allow for “automatic data balancing, greater reliability and data protection, with capacity for data and computing growth.”Residents will vote on each capital request at the Annual Town Meeting in May.(NOTE: The cover photo is from Airgoz Aerial Photography.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWilmington School System Receives $20K State Grant For Safety & Security UpgradesIn “Education”VIDEO: Watch This Week’s School Committee MeetingIn “Education”SCHOOL COMMITTEE NEWS: 5 Things That Happened At Wednesday Night’s MeetingIn “Education”last_img read more

Research trio suggest lowrelief mountain surfaces due to river network disruption

first_img Geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet Citation: Research trio suggest low-relief mountain surfaces due to river network disruption (2015, April 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-04-trio-low-relief-mountain-surfaces-due.html More information: In situ low-relief landscape formation as a result of river network disruption, Nature 520, 526–529 (23 April 2015) DOI: 10.1038/nature14354AbstractLandscapes on Earth retain a record of the tectonic, environmental and climatic history under which they formed. Landscapes tend towards an equilibrium in which rivers attain a stable grade that balances the tectonic production of elevation and with hillslopes that attain a gradient steep enough to transport material to river channels. Equilibrium low-relief surfaces are typically found at low elevations, graded to sea level. However, there are many examples of high-elevation, low-relief surfaces, often referred to as relict landscapes, or as elevated peneplains. These do not grade to sea level and are typically interpreted as uplifted old landscapes, preserving former, more moderate tectonic conditions. Here we test this model of landscape evolution through digital topographic analysis of a set of purportedly relict landscapes on the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, one of the most geographically complex, climatically varied and biologically diverse regions of the world. We find that, in contrast to theory, the purported surfaces are not consistent with progressive establishment of a new, steeper, river grade, and therefore they cannot necessarily be interpreted as a remnant of an old, low relief surface. We propose an alternative model, supported by numerical experiments, in which tectonic deformation has disrupted the regional river network, leaving remnants of it isolated and starved of drainage area and thus unable to balance tectonic uplift. The implication is that the state of low relief with low erosion rate is developing in situ, rather than preserving past erosional conditions.Press release (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and the other with Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, claim to have found evidence that suggests low-relief mountain surfaces are due to river disruption, not tectonic uplift. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Rong Yang, Sean Willett and Liran Goren describe how they showed that a portion of the Tibetan Plateau likely did not come about due to tectonic uplift and instead suggest an alternative explanation. Jérôme Lavé with Centre de Recherches Pétrographiques et Géochimiques in Rome offers a News & Views piece on the work done by the trio in the same journal issue. This beautiful scenery in Yunnan Province, China, at 3000 m asl is not likely a time capsule that preserved a relict lowland landscape. It must have formed over million of years in situ. Credit: Giuditta Fellin / ETH Zurich For many years geologists have puzzled over flat plains that exist at high altitude in mountain ranges. Common sense suggests mountains should be jagged, especially those that formed due to pressure between the Earth’s plates. Over the years, a grudging consensus has been reached—the flat plains must have got to where they are by simple uplifting—whole sections of flat earth were pushed up intact, along with the other parts of the mountain as plates collided. This idea has not been wholly embraced of course, because in many ways it seems to defy logic. In this new effort, the three researchers started out as skeptics, in looking at a part of the Tibetan Plateau known as the “Three Rivers Region”—where the Yangtze, Mekong and Salween rivers incise the plain, they could not find a way to simulate the area being uplifted, so they began to look for another explanation. To do that, they input geologic data that describes the area into a model, one that took into account the unexpectedly shallow tributaries in some parts of the Plateau and also others that were steeper—evidence, they suggest, of recent drainage.The model the trio came up with shows that the Plateau came about due to a reorganization of the river network after uplift, because parts of them became isolated. Subsequent erosion of the resultant landscape led to the flat terrain as it can be seen today. Lavé allows that the model does show what the trio suggest, but also notes that it does not seem to work as well when shifting the focus farther north in the region. He suggests future modeling should take into consideration the new findings, however, as it appears the research trio have come up with a new way of thinking about low-relief mountain surface formation.center_img Explore further © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: Nature This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

The goddess theory

first_imgAn art gallery in the Capital puts together a dramatic profusion of works from the private studio of sculptor and installation artist Narayan Chandra Sinha. The exhibition is curated by Ina Puri. Debi is a bride between craft and fine arts. It reflects an intelligent use of discarded materials and weaving them together to tell a story that resonates with culture and tradition. Yet, the language is modern, chic and understated in every sense of the word. In essence, the show is a tribute to beauty, originality and style that’s sensibly crafted in a modern language.   Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting”I have a concern to preserve culture. I use objects that have been a part and parcel of our tradition. There are thoughts and methods behind my choice of materials that may appear to be discards in the eyes of viewers,’ he says.  Sinha is a master innovator who is known for blending  different materials. There is Durga Ma beautifully welded in metal while the face is in brass. The necklace made of iron that must have been heated at a certain temperature and bend to take the shape of a neck has chunky pieces of brass including a gas stove burner.  Mark in the dates and head over.last_img read more