Charging Paralympians extra for accessible hotel rooms? I expect more from Japan

first_imgAsia Pacific Disability and sport Opinion Since you’re here… Reuse this content Share on WhatsApp comment Topics Tokyo Olympic Games 2020 … we have a small favour to ask. More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many new organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Paralympics The question we should be asking is, what do the disabled people of Japan expect to gain from the Games being held there?Judging by the way they are handling the room conversion issue, I sense a big challenge. Japan is a wealthy, developed nation – so should we expect more from them? Yes, they should be doing a lot more to welcome the disabled communities of the world arriving in their country, and they should be doing an awful lot more to improve the quality of life of the Japanese disabled community.Here in the UK we have the experience of London 2012, which demonstrated the power of the Games. The power to fill a stadium of 80,000 people. The power to start conversations around disability on primetime TV and give Paralympic athletes a platform to talk about their lives and experiences. The power to encourage people to go back to sport, to get active and to try new things.This was our experience of the Paralympics, and we are all curious to see what the impact of the Games will be in Japan. In terms of accessibility, life remains far from barrier-free here in the UK. We continue to advocate for better access and inclusion in transport systems, job opportunities, education and many more areas. But my experience of being a Paralympic athlete has made me part of a movement that is growing, opening the door to more developing nations, and creating opportunities for athletes from all over the world.Every competitor arriving in Tokyo next year will bring with them the experience of their own country, their own culture and their own challenges in making it to the Games. Many will have travelled the world to compete, and found that attitudes to disabled people can vary hugely – it is not news to us that a worldwide standard of accessibility does not exist. This is where our voices come in: we should think ahead and advocate for inclusive design in Olympic facilities (and elsewhere) that can be accessed and used by as many people as possible, regardless of disability, age and gender.Our definition of accessibility in the UK is completely different to that in Japan, and it will require a shift in perceptions and understanding to bring about lasting change. The Paralympic Games can be the catalyst for such change – and it’s an opportunity that Japan should embrace. Being a major economy, it should easily be able to make the hotel rooms accessible and keep them that way to encourage disabled people to visit a beautiful country.• Anne Wafula Strike is a Paralympian wheelchair racer and a disability rights campaigner Share on Facebookcenter_img Paralympics GB stunned after Yokohama hotels demand payment for accessibility Share on Messenger Support The Guardian Read more Share on LinkedIn Japan The Paralympic Games cannot, and should not, be expected to resolve every aspect of disability inequality or remove the practical barriers that can challenge independent living. However, we should have learned by now to not underestimate their power. The Tokyo 2020 Paralympic Games offer a huge opportunity for the city and for Japan as a whole, and it’s one that should be capitalised on.This week news stories emerged detailing the significant challenge of finding accessible accommodation in Japan, where hotels have demanded payment to make hotel rooms accessible for Paralympics GB athletes, then a subsequent payment to convert them back. It sounds like a form of exclusion – or people being penalised for being disabled. Gradually, grants are being made available to help support the process, and the British Paralympic Association has been collaborating with partners to share knowledge and expertise from the UK in how to make rooms truly accessible. But it has been a long-term conundrum that has prompted some to question if the Paralympic Games will have the impact in Tokyo that we would hope for. If these stories of hotels charging for improved accessibility play out, that’s not what we would recognise as progress, or any lasting positive legacy. Share on Pinterest Share on Twitter ParalympicsGB Share via Emaillast_img read more

Giggs slams Wales for poor display

first_imgWales manager Ryan Giggs has criticized his side for their complacency after they lost 1-0 to Albania on Tuesday.Wales end 2018 with back-to-back defeats as lost 1-0 to Albania in a friendly on Tuesday thanks to a controversial second-half penalty, and Giggs after the game admitted the players lacked concentration.“The performance was not good enough and the result was what we deserved,” Giggs told Sky Sports.“We controlled the first half and thought it was going to be easy. We should have won that game, we were in total control.Euro 2020Report: Euro 2020 qualifying Group H George Patchias – September 11, 2019 Euro 2020 qualifying Group H is being controlled by France and Turkey, but Iceland is still in with a shout.Reigning world champions France ran…“But they let themselves down tonight. We go a goal down, we don’t play our own game, we are pumping the ball in their box.“Quite simply we turned up thinking we would win and thinking someone would get us out of trouble.“I have been in football long enough to smell when something is going to happen and I said that at half-time because players didn’t have that concentration tonight.”last_img read more

More than onethird of migrants in caravan are under medical treatment confirmed

first_img November 30, 2018 Categories: Health, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter More than one-third of migrants in caravan are under medical treatment; confirmed cases of HIV and AIDS Ginger Jeffries 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsTIJUANA (KUSI) – There are serious health issues with the migrant caravan according to Tijuana’s health department. More than 1/3 of the 6,000 living in a make shift shelter are now under medical treatment. The majority dealing with respiratory infections but others with confirmed cases of tuberculosis and HIV or AIDS.This as the department of justice says there are at least 600 criminals in the caravan, some with gang ties. Authorities are also worried about a Hepititis breakout because of the sewage overflow at the outdoor sports complex housing the migrants.A second temporary shelter 11 miles further south will be  opened to to help improve conditions.  However, officials in Tijuana say they’re spending $30,000.00 a day to care for these migrants and that money runs out this week. Posted: November 30, 2018 Ginger Jeffries, last_img read more

UCSD ranked among top 100 research institutions in the US

first_img KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, June 20, 2019 UCSD ranked among top 100 research institutions in the US SAN DIEGO ( KUSI ) – UC San Diego is one of the top 10 universities in the country for research output and fourth among the country’s public universities, according to rankings released Thursday by the Nature Index.The index, a research database run by the scientific journal Nature, released its annual list of the top 500 universities and institutions for scientific research around the world. The list considered research articles published during 2018 in the 82 scientific journals in the Nature Index archive.UCSD ranked ninth among U.S. research institutions and sat behind UC Berkeley, the University of Michigan and UCLA among public universities in the U.S. Harvard University ranked second overall and first among U.S. research institutions, while the Chinese Academy of Sciences topped the list.“Our culture of experimentation and fresh thinking allow our exceptional faculty and scholars to conduct high volumes of transformative research, which has a global impact,” said Chancellor Pradeep Khosla. “UC San Diego is a unique place where fresh ideas are translated into solutions to benefit society.”U.S. universities accounted for roughly 150 entries on the list, the most of any country in the world. Chinese universities totaled nearly 100 entries on the list while the United Kingdom and Germany also had several dozen entries.The 2019 ranking is a step back for UCSD, which ranked 18th overall on Nature Index’s 2018 list. UCSD also ranked seventh among all U.S. research institutions in 2018 and third among public universities behind UC Berkeley and the University of Michigan. Posted: June 20, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Public trust on EC on the wane Shujan

first_imgCivil society platform Shushashoner Jonno Nagorik (Shujan) president Hafiz Uddin Khan addresses a press conference at the National Press Club on Wednesday. Photo: UNBMore than 52 per cent of the total 548 candidates, who are vying for mayor and ward councillor posts in the upcoming polls to three city corporations, are businessmen by profession, reports UNB.While addressing a press conference at the National Press Club organised to share the affidavits of candidates contesting in the upcoming city polls, civil society platform Shushashoner Jonno Nagorik (Shujan) said this on Wednesday.Presenting a report, Shujan representative Dilip Kumar Sarkar also said at least 43 per cent of the candidates taking part in the three elections have educational background below the secondary level.Elections to three city corporations in Sylhet, Barishal and Rajshahi are billed for 30 July.Dilip also presented the information of the candidates’ income status, picture of their assets, number of cases against them, their loan status and description and assessment of financial status of all mayoral candidates in the press conference.Local government expert Tofayel Ahmed said the EC did not properly check the information provided by the candidates in their affidavits and he urged that the EC must verify the information appropriately.Shujan said the election commission (EC) has lost the credibility, which was earlier gained through successful holding of polls in Narayanganj, Cumilla and Rangpur cities.The civil rights body said EC could not take any clear step to prevent several incidents of electoral code of conduct violations already taken place centring the upcoming city polls.That’s why, Shujan observed, public trust on EC is eroding.Mentioning the incidents of bomb blast in Rajshahi, filing of cases against the activists of BNP mayoral candidate in Sylhet and arrests of several persons, Shujan said these incidents are making people worried and concerned about the fairness of the election.Dilip Kumar Sarkar said, “Before the national parliament election these city polls are the biggest ones organised by the EC and if the EC fails to arrange elections in a free and fair way, it will give a negative impression about EC among the public.”Presiding over the programme, Shujan president Hafiz Uddin Khan alleged, “EC failed to ensure a level playing field for the each contesting candidates in these cities, which makes us concerned about the fairness of the elections.”last_img read more

5 statesmen shaped the postWorld War I era

first_img5 statesmen shaped the post-World War I eraThe Great War changed the world as empires collapsed, new nations were created and powerful political figures emerged, going on to set the agenda for a new order.Here are brief profiles of five of the leading figures of World War I and its aftermath.- US: Thomas Woodrow Wilson -Democratic president Thomas Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924) won re-election in 1916 on a campaign of keeping the United States out of the conflict in Europe, even though Washington was helping finance the Allied war effort.But this changed after German submarines sank US ships crossing the Atlantic and he sent the first troops over in April 1917.Wilson was a key player in the post-war negotiations in Paris in 1919 and the resulting Versailles Treaty was based on his “Fourteen Points” for peace.They included the creation of a body that became the League of Nations, the precursor to today’s United Nations, and provisions on sovereignty and open diplomacy.He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1920.- France: Georges Clemenceau -Nicknamed “The Tiger”, the hardline Republican Georges Clemenceau (1841-1929) was appointed French prime minister in 1917, when Allied victory seemed uncertain.With a fierce resolve for victory, he centralised and stimulated the war effort while gaining strong popular backing in part because of his regular visits to the front line.Also one of the architects of the Versailles Treaty, he was less open than his US and British allies to compromise with the Germans, insisting on punishing terms and vowing “Germany will pay”.- Britain: David Lloyd George -David Lloyd George (1863-1945) was a Liberal party pacifist who converted to rally behind the war, first as minister of munitions in 1915 and then as war minister and a galvanising prime minister in 1916.Dynamic and determined, he boosted public morale and brought new energy and organisation, creating the civil infrastructure to support the troops and unifying the Allied military command in 1917.Lloyd George represented Britain at the Paris Peace Conference and remained prime minister until 1922.- Russia: Vladimir Lenin -Marxist Bolshevik revolutionary Vladimir Ilich Ulyanov (1870-1924) lived mostly abroad during the war, which he opposed as “imperialist”.He returned home in February 1917, with the help of the Germans who hoped he would weaken their Russian enemy, and convinced fellow Bolsheviks to revolt in October.A supporter of an immediate peace with Germany, the founder of the Communist Party was the driving force in Russia for the Brest-Litovsk Treaty (1918) which ended the fighting at the cost of Moscow ceding massive areas of territory and more than 30 percent of its population.- Turkey: Mustafa Kemal Ataturk -A colonel and then general in the Ottoman army, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (1881-1938) led the victory against the Allies in the Gallipoli campaign in 1915.He went on to head a nationalist movement that fiercely opposed the 1920 Treaty of Sevres between the Allies and the Ottoman empire and which led to the latter’s dismantling.As the Allies tried to carve up the empire, Ataturk commanded an army that re-conquered Armenia and Kurdistan and drove the Greeks out of Asia Minor. He became president in 1923 and is considered the father of modern Turkey.last_img read more

Research trio suggest lowrelief mountain surfaces due to river network disruption

first_img Geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet Citation: Research trio suggest low-relief mountain surfaces due to river network disruption (2015, April 23) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-04-trio-low-relief-mountain-surfaces-due.html More information: In situ low-relief landscape formation as a result of river network disruption, Nature 520, 526–529 (23 April 2015) DOI: 10.1038/nature14354AbstractLandscapes on Earth retain a record of the tectonic, environmental and climatic history under which they formed. Landscapes tend towards an equilibrium in which rivers attain a stable grade that balances the tectonic production of elevation and with hillslopes that attain a gradient steep enough to transport material to river channels. Equilibrium low-relief surfaces are typically found at low elevations, graded to sea level. However, there are many examples of high-elevation, low-relief surfaces, often referred to as relict landscapes, or as elevated peneplains. These do not grade to sea level and are typically interpreted as uplifted old landscapes, preserving former, more moderate tectonic conditions. Here we test this model of landscape evolution through digital topographic analysis of a set of purportedly relict landscapes on the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, one of the most geographically complex, climatically varied and biologically diverse regions of the world. We find that, in contrast to theory, the purported surfaces are not consistent with progressive establishment of a new, steeper, river grade, and therefore they cannot necessarily be interpreted as a remnant of an old, low relief surface. We propose an alternative model, supported by numerical experiments, in which tectonic deformation has disrupted the regional river network, leaving remnants of it isolated and starved of drainage area and thus unable to balance tectonic uplift. The implication is that the state of low relief with low erosion rate is developing in situ, rather than preserving past erosional conditions.Press release (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers, two with the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and the other with Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, claim to have found evidence that suggests low-relief mountain surfaces are due to river disruption, not tectonic uplift. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Rong Yang, Sean Willett and Liran Goren describe how they showed that a portion of the Tibetan Plateau likely did not come about due to tectonic uplift and instead suggest an alternative explanation. Jérôme Lavé with Centre de Recherches Pétrographiques et Géochimiques in Rome offers a News & Views piece on the work done by the trio in the same journal issue. This beautiful scenery in Yunnan Province, China, at 3000 m asl is not likely a time capsule that preserved a relict lowland landscape. It must have formed over million of years in situ. Credit: Giuditta Fellin / ETH Zurich For many years geologists have puzzled over flat plains that exist at high altitude in mountain ranges. Common sense suggests mountains should be jagged, especially those that formed due to pressure between the Earth’s plates. Over the years, a grudging consensus has been reached—the flat plains must have got to where they are by simple uplifting—whole sections of flat earth were pushed up intact, along with the other parts of the mountain as plates collided. This idea has not been wholly embraced of course, because in many ways it seems to defy logic. In this new effort, the three researchers started out as skeptics, in looking at a part of the Tibetan Plateau known as the “Three Rivers Region”—where the Yangtze, Mekong and Salween rivers incise the plain, they could not find a way to simulate the area being uplifted, so they began to look for another explanation. To do that, they input geologic data that describes the area into a model, one that took into account the unexpectedly shallow tributaries in some parts of the Plateau and also others that were steeper—evidence, they suggest, of recent drainage.The model the trio came up with shows that the Plateau came about due to a reorganization of the river network after uplift, because parts of them became isolated. Subsequent erosion of the resultant landscape led to the flat terrain as it can be seen today. Lavé allows that the model does show what the trio suggest, but also notes that it does not seem to work as well when shifting the focus farther north in the region. He suggests future modeling should take into consideration the new findings, however, as it appears the research trio have come up with a new way of thinking about low-relief mountain surface formation.center_img Explore further © 2015 Phys.org Journal information: Nature This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

An ode to Pankaj Mullick

first_imgAn exponent of Rabindra sangeet, a pioneer of film music in Bengali and Hindi Cinema, a music composer and a singer- one man with an array of talents left an indelible footprint in the history of cinema. Commemorating the memories of this multifarious artist, Kamani auditorium witnessed a melodious evening on 10 April to pay a tribute to the Indian music legend- Pankaj Mallick.The musical evening was organised by Pankaj Mullick Music and Art Foundation. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Star artists, Jhinuk Gupta and Rajib Gupta, spellbound the audience with the legend’s eternal songs and immortal compositions. It was a celebration of his musical genius through an ode to his film songs, ghazals, bhajans, rabindrasangeet and bangla adhunik. It just did not end there. The audience was further taken through a journey, using video projections to describe the historical facts associated with his songs. The only grandson of the late music maestro, Rajib Gupta shared anecdotes from his grandfather’s life, adding, ‘This evening is to connect the present generation of music lovers and the heritage of Indian music.’  Pankaj Mullick- The Reel Story, a documentary directed by Rajib was screened for the fans to give them a glimpse of the late artist who gained stupendous achievements and added  a many feathers to his cap through the journey of his life.last_img read more

Police leaving no stones unturned to ensure safe IDay

first_imgKolkata: The police is taking all necessary steps to avoid any untoward incident during the Independence Day parade to be held at Red Road on Wednesday.Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee will be hoisting the national flag at Red Road. She will also be given guard-of-honour. The programme at Red Road is scheduled to start at 10 am and it will continue till around 11.30 am. The Chief Minister will also be giving out police medals in the same programme.The parade will begin with a tableau of Safe Drive Save Life and subsequently participants from Kolkata Police, West Bengal Police, school children and tableaus of different departments will be passing one after the other. Around 980 children of different schools will be performing in the parade. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal life”The Winners”, a special all-women patrolling team of the city police to combat and prevent incidents of molestation and eve-teasing in the city, will also be participating in the Independence Day parade. A team of women officers of the Rapid Action Force (RAF) will also be taking part in the parade. This will be the first time for the Mounted Police unit taking part in it.There will be tableaus on the projects including Rupashree, Kanyashree, Sabujshree, Khadya Sathi, and Sabujsathi. Besides the tableau of the Youth Services and Sports department with the theme of ‘Football’, there will also be a tableau of the Information and Cultural Affairs department based on the theme of ‘Sampriti’. Flowers will be sprinkled from helicopter at the time of the parade.Kolkata Police has tightened the security arrangements to avoid any untoward incident during the parade. An additional 1,500 policemen will be deployed and at the same time, there will be close monitoring from watchtowers. As many as 10 watchtowers have been erected around Red Road. Three Quick Response Teams (QRTs) will be deployed and there will also be six mobile patrolling units.last_img read more

Women chess players perform better than men

first_imgWhen it comes to playing chess against a male opponent, women often outperform expectations, a new study claims. The study results, published in the journal Psychological Science, indicate that women players are not affected by negative stereotypes about their chess abilities during competition games.According to the researchers, data from 1,60,000 ranked chess players and more than five million chess matches suggests that women playing against men perform better than expected based on their official chess ratings. Also Read – Add new books to your shelf”The news is good for female chess players, of whom there are exploding numbers. Although discrimination is real and pervasive, women playing tournament chess do not seem to be at a disadvantage when paired with men,” said the co-author of the study, Tom Stafford from the University of Sheffield.To investigate this phenomenon, researchers analysed data from standard tournament chess games played between rated players from January 2008 through August 2015. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe rating system continuously incorporates game outcomes to update players’ ratings. These ratings can be used to predict who will win in a match between any two players, the researcher said.In total, the analyses included data from 1,50,977 men and 16,158 women playing in 55,58,110 games.Overall, men had a slightly higher average FIDE rating than women. But the game outcomes indicated that women won matches against men more often than would have been predicted given each player’s rating. This pattern held across the whole range of rating differences. In other words, women outperformed expectations when playing a man compared with when they played against other women, a finding that runs contrary to the negative effect that one would expect as a result of stereotype threat.”These findings show that even famous psychological phenomena may not be present all the time. Factors other than stereotype threat appear to be more important in determining men and women’s tournament chess performance,” Stafford noted.last_img read more