Prep Sports Roundup: 10/29

first_img Written by Tags: Roundup FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail2-A State Volleyball Tournament QuarterfinalsRICHFIELD, Utah-The North Summit Braves overpowered Kanab 3-0 Thursday in the 2-A state volleyball quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center. The Braves prevailed 25-21, 25-15 and 25-14 to obtain the straight sets victory. North Summit next faces Duchesne Friday at 12:00 pm in the state semifinals. Kanab next faces Layton Christian Friday at 10:00 am in the consolation bracket.RICHFIELD, Utah-The Duchesne Eagles surged past Layton Christian 3-0 in the 2-A state volleyball quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center Thursday. Duchesne prevailed 25-15, 25-14 and 25-13 to win the battle of the Eagles.RICHFIELD, Utah-The Enterprise Wolves downed Gunnison Valley 3-1 Thursday in the 2-A state volleyball quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center. The Wolves prevailed 21-25, 25-19, 26-24 and 25-19 to best the Bulldogs. Enterprise next faces Millard in the state semifinals Friday at 12:00 pm. Gunnison Valley next draws Altamont in the consolation bracket Friday at 10:00 am.RICHFIELD, Utah-The Millard Eagles downed Altamont 3-0 in the 2-A state volleyball quarterfinals at the Sevier Valley Center Thursday. The Eagles prevailed 25-19, 25-17 and 25-21 to down the Longhorns. October 29, 2020 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 10/29 Brad Jameslast_img read more

Antecevic, Kelly help Cal rally, beat Utah 72-63

first_img Written by January 16, 2021 /Sports News – Local Antecevic, Kelly help Cal rally, beat Utah 72-63 Tags: California Golden Bears/Grant Antecevic/Pac-12/Utah Runnin’ Utes Basketball FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Grant Antecevic scored 10 of his 14 points in the second half, Andre Kelly had 11 points and nine rebounds, and California rallied from a 15-point deficit to beat Utah 72-63.Makale Foreman had 12 points and Jarred Hyder scored 11 for Cal (7-8, 2-6 Pac-12). Ryan Betley hit a 3-pointer and then made 3 of 3 from the free-throw line to spark a 17-4 spurt that gave Cal the lead for good. Kuany Kuany hit a 3 to cap the spurt and made it 46-42 with 12 minutes to play. Antecevic scored 10 points — including back-to-back 3s — in a 14-4 run that pushed the lead into double figures with six minutes to go.Timmy Allen scored 26 points for Utah (5-6, 2-5). Associated Presslast_img read more

The modern opens the past

first_imgIt turns out that the past has a future. That is, archaeology has a chance to transform its print-bound publishing norms into a digital-age machine for gathering, sharing, and analyzing vast stores of field data. Such information — often paid for by public funds — is more likely now to be hoarded and parceled out to journals that would be obscure or expensive for most people.Harvard-trained anthropologist Eric Kansa, Ph.D. ’01, brought this message and more to a Harvard audience in the inaugural lecture in a series organized by the Digital Futures consortium. The group began this summer as a One Harvard gathering of experts interested in how the digital age will change scholarship.Kansa is “a true revolutionary” and “an ethnologist of academic culture,” said Digital Futures co-chair Judson Harward, director of research computing for the arts and humanities at Harvard University Information Technology. And his message of helping archaeology into the present is important for the future of the profession, he added. “No academic field has a longer history of publishing. But few have so conservative a publishing tradition.” The lecture, “A More Open Future for the Past,” was delivered Sept. 10 at Science Center Hall A.Kansa teaches at the University of California, Berkeley, and co-directs the nonprofit Alexandria Archive Institute in San Francisco. He’s at the forefront of a movement to shift archaeology publishing from expensive print platforms with limited reach to open-source venues that he said will broaden usage, encourage innovation, and improve scholarship by creating vibrant communities of researchers.“The gold standard of professional communication in academic archaeology is a peer-reviewed article in an established journal,” he said. Yet the digital age already has its examples of online academic journals that are prestigious, highly accessible, and attract the best “symbolic capital,” including Nobel Prize-winning contributors. PLOS Biology is in the forefront, said Kansa, and for a decade has been marrying print-age gravitas with digital-age scholarship.Archaeology needs the same kind of forward-looking champions. Kansa looked out over the Harvard audience, which included tenured faculty, and said, “Please. Start an open-access journal.”He was quick to supply a broader context. “The need for transformation in archaeology is part of a bigger suite of movements … to reform academic communication generally,” he said. “This is just a small part of the big picture.”The broadest context relates to all the movements, inside and outside academia, that urge open access and open data throughout the online world. One landmark, said Kansa, was the 2003 Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities.Some of those contexts point to progress in open access: online social habits, including bookmarking, hyperlinks, and open annotation; text-mining, now a common tool in research; and sharing strategies — Kansa’s forte and emphasis — which require ways of structuring data so it can be distributed efficiently.In archaeology, and in academics generally, trends show: rising costs of traditional print publishing, up 300 percent since 1985; a slump in public funds for academic research and a countervailing explosion in student debt, which has risen more than 500 percent in the last decade; a shift in the academic environment from tenured faculty that has caused graduate students to flee academe or seek more “alt-ac” (alternative academic) positions; and entrenched publishing norms that put up editorial and legal impediments to sharing data.Before Internet activist Aaron Swartz committed suicide, said Kansa, he faced federal felony charges with sentences possibly totaling more than 30 years relating to his download of 3.5 million academic articles from JSTOR, a pay-walled repository for archiving such articles. “For comparison’s sake,” Kansa said, “you get 20 years for human trafficking.”All these woes explain what Kansa said was an increasingly risk-averse academic environment and its “dysfunctional incentives” to publish, to share information, and to advance ever-changing careers. Traditional journals share information only in restricted ways. Look at it like an archaeologist, he said. “If you dig up a site, you’re actually destroying it. So data is all you have left.”But there are few incentives to conform to data-recording standards that would make sharing easier. As an example, Kansa said, one researcher with multiple data spreadsheets recorded in a private code. Only the researcher and his team knew, for instance, that the number “14 means ‘sheep,’” he said.On the other hand, publishing vast bodies of archaeological data gathered in the field, if done properly, would expand the quality, scale, and accessibility of information that reveals how humans once lived. The point, he said, is to publish data, whether old or new, “so it is fit for wider consumption, for wider use.”He said that the Britain-based Archaeology Data Service is archiving some open data content that is in accessible file formats, and can be legally transferred for free. At Harvard, the Shelby White and Leon Levy Program for Archaeological Publications supports open data publication. (Kansa is a board member at the Harvard program, which gives out nearly $1 million a year to fund publications of archaeological excavations.) More broadly, the Obama administration has recognized that “open access to public research is an important goal,” he said.But there’s the rub. Data has to be “structured,” said Kansa, edited into format architectures that make it easy to search, compress, and analyze. “If you care” about data, he said, “you have to care more and more about structured data.”That’s Kansa’s specialty. His Open Context nonprofit promotes “data-sharing as a form of publishing,” he said. It has 38 projects going now, on topics ranging from Asian stoneware jars to maps of animal bones that help determine the rise and spread of agriculture. The California Digital Library, a prestigious repository and arm of the University of California, handles Open Context’s data preservation and archiving.There are other ventures exploring data publication, said Kansa, including the for-profit Journal of Open Archaeology Data.But that is just the beginning. Kansa showed two views of the Web of Data map from 2009 and 2011 — a blooming, flower-like graphical representation of sites that carry open data from a variety of fields, arranged so machines can access and process linked data. “We need archaeology on that map,” he said. “If you’re not [on the map], you’re working in isolation.”“This is really a lot of work,” said Kansa of wrangling data sets into order. Complicating the issue is archaeology itself. The profession is rife with data rich in numbers, words, photos, and graphics, as, for example, in studying distribution patterns for animal bones or Asian stoneware.“Data are hard,” he said. “Data never speak for themselves,” but have to be formatted and clarified in much the way that an editor prepares text — hence the data publishing analogy.Once data are available in clarified formats, they begin to bring together scholars from diverse disciplines in ways that make the world a more understandable, collaborative, and interconnected place. After all, the original intent of the Web was to create communities of inquiry, said Kansa, since “You don’t just share data to make it useful.”On a smaller scale, those intersecting communities are already evident at Harvard. Co-sponsoring the Kansa lecture with the Digital Futures consortium were DARTH Crimson, Harvard’s Digital Arts and Humanities initiative, the Harvard Library, the Harvard College Library, the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, the Harvard Department of Anthropology, the FAS Standing Committee on Archaeology, and the Harvard Semitic Museum.The lecture is available for viewing online.last_img read more

Funding for projects with promise

first_imgFour scientists from across Harvard will receive nearly $8 million in grant funding through the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) High Risk-High Reward program to support research into a variety of biomedical questions, ranging from how the bacterial cell wall is constructed to how the blood-brain barrier works.Ethan Garner, assistant professor of molecular and cellular biology at the Center for Systems Biology, will receive a New Innovator Award; Alison Hill, a postdoctoral fellow at the Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, will receive an Early Independence Award; and Chenghua Gu, associate professor of neurobiology at Harvard Medical School, and Donna Spiegelman, professor of epidemiologic methods at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (HSPH), will both receive Pioneer Awards.“Supporting innovative investigators with the potential to transform scientific fields is a critical element of our mission,”’ said NIH Director Francis S. Collins. “This program allows researchers to propose highly creative research projects across a broad range of biomedical and behavioral research areas that involve inherent risk but have the potential to lead to dramatic breakthroughs.”Ethan Garner“When I heard [about receiving the grant], I was very excited, but also very humbled and relieved,” Garner said. “This is a fortunate grant to get in the current funding climate, as both NIH and universities are cutting back on funding research.”Garner, who will receive $300,000 a year over five years, said the grant will allow him to investigate the machinery that builds the cell wall that surrounds bacteria.The hope, he said, is that a better understanding of that machinery — both how it works and how cells use it to protect themselves — could lead to the development of new antibiotics that target previously unidentified weak points in the system.“This grant will allow us to do a systematic study of bacterial growth to not only understand how this machinery works, but also to learn how the cell controls it [i.e., what dials does the cell turn to grow faster or slower],” he said. “More importantly, this grant will allow us to figure out how bacteria ‘re-tune’ this machinery to protect themselves [or repair their wall] when they are stressed or when they are exposed to antibiotics.”Alison HillHill plans to use her grant — $250,000 a year over five years — to fund a small research group, including research assistants, students, and postdocs, to develop new tools to help in the search for a cure for HIV/AIDS.“HIV can currently be effectively treated with combination antiretroviral therapy, but these drugs do not cure the infection and must be taken for life,” Hill said. “As a result, treatments are expensive and cumbersome, especially for patients in the developing world.“New therapies are being developed to eliminate the virus from patients and provide a cure, but their effects are currently very difficult to forecast or quantify,” she continued. “My work aims to develop mathematical and computational tools to help predict and interpret these new curative strategies for HIV, and therefore speed up their deployment.”Hill, who only found out about the grant days before the application was due, said she was shocked to receive the award.“A number of scientists I really look up to have been previous recipients of these awards,” she said. “I never thought I’d be one of them!”Chenghua GuGu hopes to use the grant — $500,000 a year for five years — to develop two new technologies aimed at helping researchers better understand the blood-brain barrier (BBB).“The blood-brain barrier is the gatekeeper for the brain so that the brain can function in a protected environment,” Gu said. “On the other hand, it is also a major obstacle for drug delivery to the central nervous system.“Remarkably, little is known about the molecular and cellular processes that define the blood-brain barrier function,” she added. “The major impediment to understanding the BBB is identifying its essential constituent and unraveling the mechanism by which these key regulators control BBB function. New tools thus are needed for understanding the BBB.”Those new tools, Gu said, would include an effort to screen candidate genes that control the blood-brain barrier and later reconstitute it using re-engineered stem cells. The second technology, she said, is a new high-resolution imaging method to monitor the integrity of the blood-brain barrier in real time.“This integrated approach will address fundamental questions about the regulation of the BBB, which will then lead to more effective therapeutic strategies and specific targets for BBB restoration and manipulation,” Gu said.Donna SpiegelmanAs the first epidemiologist and biostatistician, and the first faculty member of any school of public health to receive an NIH Pioneer Award, Spiegelman said she hopes her award paves the way for others in her professions going forward.“In addition, I hope that these firsts are a harbinger of an increasing focus at the National Institutes of Health on public health itself,” she said. “Of course, basic science and clinical research are of critical importance, but a … greater focus on public health inquiry would open up vast areas of opportunities for discovery among scientists, epidemiologists, statisticians, and other public health professionals.”Spiegelman’s plans for the grant — $500,000 annually for five years — focus on the development of new methods needed to advance the field of implementation science, a field that seeks to identify the most effective public health interventions, with a particular focus on environmental health, nutrition and chronic disease, and HIV/AIDS.To that end, Spiegelman plans to convene a stakeholders advisory board (SAB), to be chaired by Julio Frenk, dean of the HSPH and T & G Angelopoulos Professor of Public Health and International Development. The group’s annual meetings will be used to identify the most pressing methodological questions confronted by researchers studying implementation science.last_img read more

Vermont Chamber of Commerce Names 2010 Top Ten Summer & Fall Events

first_imgThe Vermont Chamber of Commerce is pleased to announce the highly anticipated 2010 Top Ten Summer and Fall Events.  The 2010 award recipients display a wide variety of unique Vermont activities that will provide something fun for everyone in all corners of the Green Mountain State.  The winners in chronological order include:Vermont Maple Festival: Celebrate the Official Flavor of VermontSt. Albans, April 30 to May 2, see website for hours & admission (much is free).At the end of winter, it s time to celebrate the Official Flavor of Vermont – PURE MAPLE! The Vermont Maple Festival is three days of fun and learning – there s something for everyone – kids, teens, families, singles, and seniors. Main Street entertainment, Maple Exhibit Hall, antique & craft shows, cooking demonstrations, sugarhouse tours, face painting, a Grand Parade and a Maple Buffet, pancake breakfasts, fiddlers and youth talent shows, carnival, Sap Run Foot Race, historical museum, a pretty park for playing and picnicking, a downtown of delightful shops, and more. www.vermontmaplefestival.org(link is external), 802-524-5800.Burlington Discover Jazz FestivalBurlington, June 4 to 13The Burlington Discover Jazz Festival celebrates its 27th year with the sounds of jazz, blues, funk and Latin music. For 10 days more than 45,000 people enjoy a unique mix of concerts, street parties, cruises on Lake Champlain, meet the artist sessions and more. Past headliners have included Diana Krall, Dave Brubeck, Ella Fitzgerald, and Dizzy Gillespie. See website for event details. www.discoverjazz.com(link is external), 802-863-7992, tickets: 802-863-5966.Strolling of the HeifersBrattleboro, June 4 to 6, Fri. 5 – midnight, Sat. 8 am to 3 pm, Sun. 8 am to 3 pm.Inspired by Spain s famous Running of the Bulls, Brattleboro s annual Strolling of the Heifers parade features scores of heifers ambling up the town s historic Main Street, along with many farmers, cows, bulls, horses, goats, poultry, floats, tractors, bands, clowns, and much more. When it s over, the crowd follows the parade to the grounds of the Commons and enjoys food, music, dancing and fun at the Dairy Festival. The event is held each year on the first weekend in June, which is National Dairy Month. Free.www.strollingoftheheifers.com(link is external), 802-258-9177.Vermont Quilt FestivalEssex Junction, June 25 to 27, Fri. & Sat. 9 am – 6 pm, Sun. 9 am – 3 pm.Thread your way to the beautiful Lake Champlain Valley for a delightful experience for the whole family at New England s oldest and largest quilt event. Be dazzled by some 500 breathtaking new and antique quilts and enjoy workshops, lectures and entertaining free gallery talks and demos. Shop the colorful merchants mall for treasures to suit everyone, treat the kids to fun kids classes, and bring your quilts for appraisal. All at the air-conditioned Champlain Valley Expo. $12 adults, seniors and groups $10, children under 14 free.www.vqf.org(link is external), 802-872-0034.Vermont Summer Festival Horse ShowEast Dorset, July 7 to August 15, Wednesdays to Sundays, 8 am – 4 pm.The Vermont Summer Festival is a six-week-long show jumping event featuring five rings of equestrian jumping action. The largest event of its type in New England, it s a chance to see world-ranked horse and rider combos as well as kids on ponies, competing for blue ribbons and more than $750,000 in prize money. All the action takes place on show grounds complete with food vendors, shopping and a bar. Wed.- Sat. $5, Sun. $7.www.vt-summerfestival.com(link is external), Prior to July 1 call 802-496-9667 and after July 1 call 802-362-7548.Stoweflake Annual Hot Air Balloon FestivalStowe, July 9 to 11.25 hot air balloons will soar during the 24th Annual Stoweflake Hot Air Balloon Festival. Begins Friday, July 9 at 4 pm, launch at 6:30 pm, continuing with sunrise launches at 6:30 am on Saturday, July 10, and Sunday, July 11. Second twilight launch at 6:30 pm on Saturday, July 10. Children s activities, live music, food, beer and wine. Balloon rides $275 per person, tethered rides $10 per person. Adults $10, children 12 and under free. www.stoweflake.com(link is external), 800-253-2232.SolarFest: the New England Renewable Energy FestivalTinmouth, July 16 to 18, Fri. 12 – 10 pm, Sat. 9 am – 11 pm, Sun. 9 am to 7 pm.SolarFest s 16th annual festival is a renewable energy-powered celebration of the performing arts, sustainable living, and community. The weekend is packed with education and entertainment. Six tents house more than 100 workshops on renewable energy and sustainable living topics, plus world-class performers on two solar-powered stages, Theater-in-the-Woods, more than 100 exhibitors inside and out, crafts, clothing, food, children s activities, bonfire art and much more.  See website for admission. www.solarfest.org(link is external), 802-235-1513.Vermont Mozart FestivalJuly 18 to August 8, see website for individual event details and locations.Entering its 37th summer season, the Vermont Mozart Festival continues to enrich people s lives with beautiful music in special Vermont places. The festival brings more than 90 artists from around the world to perform classical masterpieces at 19 concerts in a variety of scenic and historic venues. The 2010 season will celebrate the works of Chopin and his concertos and solos for the piano. www.vtmozart.org(link is external), 802-862-7352.Deerfield Valley Blueberry FestivalWhitingham, Wilmington, Dover, Wardsboro, July 31 to August 9, see website for event details.What started out as a silly blue whim has turned into an all-inclusive cooperative between local businesses, churches, a town Economic Group, Chamber of Commerce, farms and charitable groups. The Deerfield Valley Blueberry Festival promotes all things Blue and Agricultural! Ever roll in 100 gallons of Blueberry Jell-O, dress up as a blueberry fairy, attended a Blueberry Block Party, seen a blue llama, shop for bluelight specials, visit a Deja Blue Car Show? Many events are free. www.vermontblueberry.com(link is external), 802-464-5618.Vermont Festival of the ArtsWatisfield, Warren, Moretown, Fayston, Middlesex, Granville, Rochester, August 1 to Labor Day WeekendVermont Festival of the Arts is a month-long (actually 5 weeks!) celebration of the arts running throughout the Mad River Valley and beyond. The Festival is comprised of more than 125 events ranging from exhibits and performances to painting, poetry and crafts, poetry workshops, lectures, a full moon celebration and culinary extravaganzas. The center of the state is the center for the arts in Vermont. August is Art in the Mad River Valley. www.vermontartfest.com(link is external), 802-496-6682.15th Annual Southern Vermont Garlic & Herb FestivalBennington, September 4 and 5, 10 am – 5 pm.Live music all day! Great food from garlic ice cream, sausage, to garlic margaritas. Cooking demos, planting and braiding. Children s activities! Camelot Village.  $5, under 12  $1. www.bennington.com(link is external), 802-447-3311.Killington Classic Motorcycle RallyKillington, September 9 to 12.The town of Killington invites you to join the Thunder Through the Mountains: the Killington Classic. Go for the ride, stay for the party! Welcome event, vendors, pig roast, bike show and grand parade to Rutland and the Vermont State Fair. Autumn in Vermont is spectacular and what better way to enjoy it than from your motorcycle. The welcome mat is out and Killington looks forward to your visit! $10.www.killingtonclassic.com(link is external), 800-337-1928.South End Art HopBurlington, September 10 and 11, Fri. 5 – 9 pm, Sat. 10 am – 10 pm.Art, fashion, community, creativity, it s all part of the 18th annual South End Art Hop that s set to take over Burlington s South End on September 10 and 11. With more than 500 artists displaying work in more than 100 sites, there s plenty to explore. Bring your family. Meet up with friends. Buy some art. Visit online. Most activities are free to the public. www.seaba.com(link is external), 802-859-9222.Tunbridge World s FairTunbridge, September 16 to 19.The 139th Tunbridge World s Fair is a blend of active livestock shows with beautiful farm animals, a good old fair-time midway, and a competitive harvest and crafts exhibition. Not only a demonstration of traditional agriculture, it also looks to the future of Vermont farming with diversity, and heritage breeds. As a family venue this couldn t be better – for all ages and interests – tucked away in this charming valley. See website for admission. www.tunbridgefair.com(link is external), 800-889-5555.                       Stowe OktoberfestStowe, September 24 to 26.The Stowe Rotary Club brings a Bavarian village to life in Stowe s Jackson Arena for an entire weekend with oompah bands, authentic German foods, freshly brewed Vermont beers and fun activities for the kids. Friday night s live music and dancing kick-off party is admission free. Saturday s activities begin with a parade through town.  See website for hours and admission. www.stoweoktoberfest.com(link is external), 802-253-8506.Vermont Life Wine & Harvest FestivalWilmington, September 24 to 26.Annual festival celebrating the best of wine, food and the good life! The Vermont Life Wine & Harvest Festival highlights the unparalleled quality and ingenuity of Vermont producers and artisans. Special dinner wine pairings, food demonstrations, and tastes from a variety of exhibitors. See website for hours and admission. www.thevermontfestival.com(link is external), 877-887-6884.Brattleboro Literary FestivalBrattleboro, October 1 to 3, 10 am – 7 pm.The annual Brattleboro Literary Festival features emerging and established authors of fiction, non-fiction, poetry and children s literature in readings, panel discussions, and special events. More than thirty authors appear each year in a series of events, many of them targeted to children and families.  Free. www.brattleboroliteraryfestival.org(link is external), 802-365-7673.Dead Creek Wildlife DayAddison, October 2, 9:30 am – 4 pm.Activities at Dead Creek Wildlife Day are especially for people who enjoy hunting, fishing, bird watching, or learning about Vermont s diverse wildlife. The day-long event features nature walks, live wildlife demonstrations, hunting dog demonstrations, fishing and hunting tips, and much more. Plus, there are plenty of kid-friendly activities like decoy carving, face painting and building bluebird boxes. All events are free, and a complimentary shuttle bus provides regular access to nearby field events. www.vtfishandwildlife.com(link is external), 802-241-3700.18th Annual Hildene Fall Arts FestivalManchester, October 1 to 3, 10 am – 5 pm.200 juried artists and artisans exhibit one-of-a-kind creations as well as contemporary and traditional craftwork. This is the largest craft marketplace in southern Vermont. Craft demonstrations educate and accentuate that everything is handmade. Live music and kids activities. The Vermont Cheese, Beer and Sausage Tent returns along with localvores food court featuring Vermont Roast Pig. Specialty food vendors sell gourmet products to take home. All exhibits are housed under large, heated Camelot tents.  Adult $8.www.craftproducers.com(link is external), 802-362-2100.Harvest Weekend at Billings Farm & MuseumWoodstock, October 9 & 10, 10 am – 5 pm.The two-day event features a husking bee and barn dance each day plus a variety of 19th century harvest activities including pressing cider, preserving apples, putting food by, harvesting vegetables in the Heirloom Garden, shelling vegetables, and fun activities; fence building, apples-on-a-string, and 19th century games. Hot spiced cider and homemade doughnuts will be served to all. Adults $11, seniors $10, ages 5-15 $6, ages 3-4 $3, under 2 free. www.billingsfarm.org(link is external), 802-457-2355.Each year, a panel of independent judges chooses Vermont s best activities, selected for their diversity and wide appeal. The 2010 winners display a wide range of family-friendly activities and represent many different parts of the state.In order to qualify as a Vermont Chamber of Commerce Top Ten Event, events must appeal to out-of-state visitors as well as Vermonters; appeal to a diverse audience, including children and families; and due to the additional attention a Top Ten Award garners, the event must be able to accommodate an influx of visitors up to twice the normal count.The Vermont Chamber of Commerce, the largest state-wide private, not-for-profit business organization represents nearly every sector of the state s corporate/hospitality community. Our mission is to create an economic climate conducive to business growth and the preservation of the Vermont quality of life. Source: Vermont Chamber of Commercelast_img read more

Notice

first_imgThe Board of Governors is seeking applicants for the following vacancies to be filled during its December 10. Florida Judicial Qualifications Commission: One attorney to serve a six-year term on the 15-member commission, authorized under Article V., Section 12, Florida Constitution, to investigate complaints against judges whose conduct demonstrates a present unfitness to hold office and could recommend disciplinary action to the Supreme Court. No member of the commission, except a judge, shall be eligible for state judicial office while acting as a member of the commission and for a period of two years thereafter. No member of the commission shall hold office in a political party or participate in any campaign for judicial office or hold office; provided that a judge may campaign for judicial office and hold that office. Florida Rural Legal Services, Inc., Board of Directors: One attorney to serve a three-year term on its 19-member board of directors. Other appointments are made by the ACLU, NAACP, several housing authorities and various other small groups. The main purpose of Florida Rural Legal Services is to help migrant farm workers and the rural poor in civil (not criminal) cases. Florida Realtor-Attorney Joint Committee: Five attorneys, one from each state appellate district, for two-year terms. The Florida Bar president receives the recommendations of the Real Property, Probate, and Trust Law Section for consideration. The committee is composed of 10 lawyers appointed by TFB and 10 Realtors appointed by the Florida Association of Realtors. The committee promotes cordial relations between Realtors and attorneys and presents educational seminars. Eleventh U.S. Circuit Judicial Conference: One delegate to represent the Southern District of Florida for a four-year term. The biennial conference consists of educational opportunities and meetings (by state) on matters of mutual concern. The Bar’s three delegates contribute to planning and organizing a reception during the conference in every odd numbered year.All terms for the foregoing appointments are set to commence January 1, 2005. Persons interested in applying for any of these vacancies may download the special appointment application from the Bar’s Web site, www.flabar.org, or call Bar headquarters at (850) 561-5757, to obtain an application form. Completed applications must be submitted to the Executive Director, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300 no later than close of business, Friday, November 5. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of an application.Proposed juvenile procedure rules Tampa bankruptcy judge needed Notice October 1, 2004 Notices Notice The Florida Bar’s Juvenile Court Rules Committee has filed an out-of-cycle petition to amend the Florida Rules of Juvenile Procedure to conform the rules to the Florida Statutes in light of amendments made by the 2004 legislature. The court invites all interested persons to comment on the committee’s proposed amendments, which are reproduced in full below, as well as online at www.flcourts.org/sct/sctdocs/proposed.html. An original and nine copies of all comments must be filed with the court on or before November 1, with a certificate of service verifying that a copy has been served on the committee chair, Deborah Ann Schroth, Florida Legal Services, Inc., 126 West Adams Street, Suite 502, Jacksonville 32202-3849, as well as a separate request for oral argument if the person filing the comment wishes to participate in oral argument which may be scheduled in this case. All comments must be filed in paper format and in WordPerfect 5.1 (or higher) format on a DOS formatted 3-1/2 inch diskette. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA AMENDMENTS TO THE FLORIDA RULES OF JUVENILE PROCEDURE, CASE NO. SC04-1653 RULE 8.041 WITNESS ATTENDANCE AND SUBPOENAS (a) Attendance. A witness summoned by a sub­poena in an adjudicatory hearing shall remain in attendance at the adjudicatory hearing until excused by the court or by both parties. A witness who departs without being excused properly may be held in criminal contempt of court. (b) Subpoenas Generally. (1) Subpoenas for testi­mony before the court and subpoenas for produc­tion of tangible evidence before the court may be issued by the clerk of the court, by any attorney of record in an action, or by the court on its own motion. (2) Except as otherwise required by this rule, the procedure for issuance of a subpoena (except for a subpoena duces tecum) by an attorney of record in a proceeding shall be as provided in the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure. (c) Subpoenas for Testimony or Production of Tangible Evidence. (1) Every subpoena for testimony or production of tangible evidence before the court shall be issued by an attorney of record in an action or by the clerk under the seal of the court. The subpoena shall state the name of the court and the title of the action and shall command each person to whom it is directed to attend and give testimony or produce evidence at a time and place specified. (2) On oral request of an attorney of record, and without a witness praecipe, the clerk shall issue a subpoena for testimony before the court or a sub­poena for tangible evidence before the court. The subpoena shall be signed and sealed but other­wise blank, both as to the title of the action and the name of the person to whom it is directed. The subpoena shall be filled in before service by the attorney. (d) Subpoenas for Production of Tangible Evi­dence. If a subpoena commands the person to whom it is directed to produce the books, papers, documents, or tangible things designated in it, the court, on motion made promptly and in any event at or before the time specified in the subpoena for compliance with it, may (1) quash or modify the subpoena if it is un­reasonable and oppressive, or (2) condition denial of the motion on the advancement by the person in whose behalf the subpoena is issued of the reasonable cost of producing the books, papers, documents, or tangible things. RULE 8.225. PROCESS, DILIGENT SEARCHES, AND SERVICE OF PLEADINGS AND PAPERS (a) Summons and Subpoenas. (1) Summons. Upon the filing of a dependency petition, the clerk shall issue a summons. The sum­mons shall require the per­son on whom it is served to appear for a hearing at a time and place specified not less than 72 hours after service of the summons. A copy of the petition shall be attached to the summons. (2) Subpoenas. Subpoenas for testimony before the court, for production of tangible evidence, and for taking depositions shall be issued by the clerk of the court, the court on its own motion, or any attorney of record for a party. Subpoenas may be served within the state by any person over 18 years of age who is not a party to the proceeding. In dependency and termination of parental rights pro­ceedings, subpoenas also may also be served by autho­rized agents of the department or the guardian ad litem. Except as otherwise required by this rule, the procedure for issuance of a subpoena by an attorney of record in a proceeding shall be as provided in the Florida Rules of Civil Procedure. (3) Service of Summons and Other Process to Persons Residing in the State. The summons and other process shall be served upon all parties other than the petitioner as required by law. The summons and other process may be served by authorized agents of the department or the guardian ad litem. (A)Service by publication shall not be required for dependency hearings and shall be required only for service of summons in a termina­tion of parental rights proceeding for parents whose identities are known but whose whereabouts cannot be determined despite a diligent search. Service by publication in these circumstances shall be con­sidered valid service. (B) The failure to serve a party or give notice to a participant in a dependency hearing shall not affect the validity of an order of adjudication or disposition if the court finds that the petitioner has completed a diligent search that failed to ascertain the identity or location of that party. (C) Personal appearance of any person in a hearing before the court eliminates the requirement for serving process upon that person. (4) Service of Summons and Other Process to Persons Residing Outside of the State in Dependency Proceedings. (A) Service of the summons and other pro­cess on parents, parties, participants, petitioners, or persons outside this state shall be in a manner reasonably calculated to give actual notice, and may be made: (i) by personal delivery outside this state in a manner prescribed for service of process within this state; (ii) in a manner prescribed by the law of the place in which service is made for service of process in that place in an action in any of its courts of general jurisdiction; (iii) by any form of mail addressed to the person to be served and requesting a receipt; or (iv) as directed by the court. Service by publication shall not be required for dependency hearings. (B) Notice under this rule shall be served, mailed, delivered, or last published at least 20 days before any hearing in this state. (C) Proof of service outside this state may be made by affidavit of the person who made the service or in the manner prescribed by the law of this state, the order pursuant to which the service is made, or the law of the place in which the service is made. If service is made by mail, proof may be in a receipt signed by the addressee or other evi­dence of delivery to the addressee. (D) Personal appearance of any person in a hearing before the court eliminates the requirement for serving process upon that person. (b) Paternity Inquiry and Diligent Search. (1) Identity Unknown. If the identity of a parent is unknown, and a petition for dependency, shelter care, or termination of parental rights is filed, the court shall conduct the inquiry required by law. The information required by law may be sub­mitted to the court in the form of a sworn affidavit executed by a person having personal knowledge of the facts. (2) Location Unknown. If the location of a parent is unknown and that parent has not filed a permanent address designation with the court, the petitioner shall under­take a diligent search as required by law. (3) Affidavit of Diligent Search. If the location of a parent is unknown after the diligent search has been completed, the petitioner shall file with the court an affidavit of diligent search executed by the person who made the search and inquiry. (4) Continuing Duty. After filing an affidavit of diligent search in a dependency or termination of parental rights proceeding, the petitioner, and, if the court requires, the department, are under a con­tinuing duty to search for and attempt to serve the parent whose location is unknown until excused from further diligent search by the court. The department shall report on the results of the continuing search at each court hearing until the person is located or until further search is excused by the court. (5) Effect of Paternity Inquiry and Diligent Search. (A) Failure to serve parents whose identity or residence is unknown shall not affect the validity of an order of adjudication or disposition if the court finds the petitioner has completed a diligent search. (B) If the court inquiry fails to identify any person as a parent or prospective parent, the court shall so find and may proceed without further notice. (C) If the inquiry, diligent search, or sub­sequent search identifies and locates any person who may be a parent or prospective parent, the court shall require notice of the hearing to be provided to that person. That person must then be given an opportunity to become a party to the proceedings by completing a sworn affidavit of parenthood and filing it with the court or the depart­ment. (c) Notice and Service of Pleadings and Papers. (1) Notice of Arraignment Hearings in Depen­dency Cases. Notice of the arraignment hearing must be served on all parties with the summons and peti­tion. The document containing the notice to appear in a dependency arraignment hearing must contain, in type at least as large as the balance of the document, the following or substantially similar language: “FAILURE TO PERSONALLY APPEAR AT THE ARRAIGN­MENT HEARING CONSTITUTES CON­SENT TO THE ADJUDICATION OF THIS CHILD (OR THESE CHILDREN) AS A DEPENDENT CHILD (OR CHILDREN) AND MAY ULTIMATELY RESULT IN LOSS OF CUSTODY OF THIS CHILD (OR THESE CHILDREN).” (2) Notice of Assessment of Child Support. Other than as part of a disposition order, if the court, on it own motion or at the request of any party, seeks to impose or enforce a child support obligation on any parent, all parties and participants are entitled to reasonable notice that child support will be addressed at a future hearing. (3) Notice of Hearings to Participants and Parties Whose Identity or Address are Known. All par­ticipants and parties whose identity and address are known must be notified of all pro­ceedings and hear­ings subsequent to the initial hearing, unless otherwise provided by law. Notice to parents in proceedings involving shelter hearings and hearings resulting from medical emergencies must be that which is most likely to result in actual notice. It is the duty of the petitioner or moving party to notify all par­ticipants and parties known to the petitioner or moving party of all hearings subsequent to the initial hearing, except hearings which must be noticed by the court. Addi­tional notice is not required if notice was provided to the parties in writing by the court or is contained in prior court orders and those orders were provided to the par­tici­pant or party. (4) Service of Pleadings, Orders, and Papers. Unless the court orders otherwise, every pleading, order, and paper filed in the action after the initial petition, shall be served on each party or the party’s attorney. Nothing herein shall be construed to require that a plea be in writing or that an appli­cation for witness subpoena be served. (5) Method of Service. When service is required or permitted to be made upon a party or participant represented by an attorney, service shall be made upon the attorney unless service upon the party or partici­pant is ordered by the court. (A) Service is excused if the identity or residence of the party or participant is unknown and a diligent search for that person has been completed in accordance with law. (B) Service upon the attorney shall be made by delivering a copy to the attorney or by mailing it to the attorney’s last known address. (C) Delivery of a copy within this rule shall mean: (i) handing it to the attorney; (ii) leaving it at the attorney’s office with the person in charge thereof; (iii) if there is no one in charge of the office, leaving it a conspicuous place therein; or (iv) transmitting it by facsimile to the attorney’s or party’s office with a cover sheet containing the sender’s name, firm, address, telephone number, and facsimile number, the number of pages transmitted, and the recipient’s facsimile number. When service is made by facsimile, a copy shall also be served by any other method permitted by this rule. Facsimile service occurs when transmission is complete. (D) If the party or participant is not represented by an attorney, service of all pleadings or papers shall be upon the party or participant. Service may be made by mail to the party’s or participant’s per­manent mailing address, if one has been provided to the court; to the last known address, if a permanent mailing address has not been provided to the court; or by leaving it at their usual place of abode with some person of their family above 15 years of age and informing such person of the contents. (E) Service by mail shall be complete upon mailing. (6) Filing. The filing of pleadings and other papers with the court as required by these rules shall be made by filing the original with the clerk of the court either before service or immediately thereafter. The court may permit the papers to be filed with it, in which event the filing date shall be noted thereon and the papers shall be transmitted to the office of the clerk. (7) Certificate of Service. When any authorized person shall in substance certify: “I certify that a copy/copies has/have been furnished to (insert names or names) by (delivery) (mail) (fax) on (date). ___________________ Title” this certificate shall be taken as prima facie proof of such service in compliance with all rules of court and law. The certificate must be signed by the attorney of record, clerk or deputy clerk, judicial assistant, or judge. RULE 8.415. JUDICIAL REVIEW OF DEPENDENCY CASES (a) Required Review. All dependent children shall have their status reviewed as provided by law. (b) Scheduling Hearings. (1) Initial Review Hearing. The court shall determine when the first review hearing shall be held and the clerk of the court shall immediately schedule the review hearing. In no case shall the hearing be scheduled for later than 6 months from the date of removal from the home or 90 days from the disposition or case plan approval hearing, whichever comes first. In every case, the court must conduct a judicial review at least every 6 months. (2) Subsequent Review Hearings. At each judicial review hearing, the court shall schedule the next judicial review hearing which shall be conducted within 6 months. The clerk of the court, at the judicial review hearing, shall provide the parties with written notice of the date, time, and location of the next judicial review hearing. (c) Report. In all cases, the department or its agent shall prepare a report to the court. The report shall contain facts showing the court to have jurisdiction of the cause as a dependency case. It shall contain information as to the identity and residence of the parent, if known, and the legal custodian, the dates of the original dependency adjudication and any subsequent judicial review proceedings, and a request for one or more of the following forms of relief: (1) that the child’s placement be changed; (2) that the case plan be continued to permit the parents or social service agency time to complete the tasks assigned to them in the agreement; or (3) that proceedings be instituted to terminate parental rights and legally free the child for adoption. (d) Service. A copy of the report containing recommendations and, if not previously provided by the court, a notice of review hearing shall be served on all persons who are required by law to be served at least 72 hours prior to the judicial review hearing. (e) Information Available to Court. At the judicial review hearing the court may receive any relevant and material evidence pertinent to the cause. This shall include written reports required by law and may include, but shall not be limited to, any psychiatric or psychological evaluations of the child or parent, caregiver, or legal custodian that may be obtained and that are material and relevant. This evidence may be received by the court and relied on to the extent of its probative value, even though it may not be competent in an adjudicatory hearing. (f) Court Action. (1) The court shall hold a hearing to review the compliance of the parties with the case plan to determine what assigned tasks were and were not accomplished and the reasons for their nonachievement. (2) If the court finds that the parents have substantially complied with the case plan, the court shall return the child to the custody of the parents if the court is satisfied that reunification will not be detrimental to the child’s safety, well-being, or physical, mental, or emotional health. (3) If the court finds that the social service agency has not complied with its obligations, the court may find the social service agency to be in contempt, shall order the social service agency to submit its plan for compliance with the plan, and shall require the social service agency to show why the child could not safely be safely returned to the home of the parents. If the court finds that the child could not be safely returned to the parents, it shall extend the case plan for a period of not more than 6 months to allow the social service agency to comply with its obligations under the case plan. (4) At any judicial review held under section 39.701(6), Florida Statutes, if, in the opinion of the court, the department has not complied with its obligations as specified in the written case plan or in the provision of independent living services as required by sections 39.701(6) and 409.1451, Florida Statutes, the court shall issue a show cause order. If cause is shown for failure to comply, the court shall give the department 30 days within which to comply and, on failure to comply with this or any subsequent order, the court may hold the department in contempt. ( 4 5 ) If, at any judicial review hearing, regardless of the expiration date of the case plan, the court finds that the parents have not substantially complied with the case plan to the degree that further reunification efforts are without merit, the court may order the social service agency to initiate a termination of parental rights proceeding. If the court finds that an order initiating a termination of parental rights proceeding would not be in the child’s best interests; that the parents in good faith attempted to comply with the terms of the plan but need more time to accomplish their assigned tasks and believes the parents will accomplish them; or, by clear and convincing proof, that the situation of the child is so extraordinary that the case plan should be extended, the court may extend the time limitation for the plan or modify the terms of the plan. No plan shall be extended for a period longer than 6 months. At the expiration of the extended plan, the court shall again review the child’s status. ( 5 6 ) When a child is returned to the parents, the court shall not terminate its jurisdiction over the child until 6 months after the return. Based on a report of the department and any other relevant factors, the court shall then determine whether the jurisdiction should be continued or terminated ; . i If its jurisdiction is to be terminated, it shall enter an order to that effect. ( 6 7 ) When a child has not been returned to the parent, but has been permanently committed to the department or to a licensed child-placing agency willing to receive the child for subsequent adoption, the court shall continue to hold judicial review hearings on the status of the child at least every 6 months until the adoption is finalized. Such hearings shall be held in accordance with these rules. ( 7 8 ) The court shall enter a written order upon the conclusion of the review hearing including a statement of the facts, those findings it was directed to determine by law, a determination of the future course of the proceedings, and the date, time, and place of the next hearing. (g) Administrative Review. The department, under a formal agreement with the court in particular cases, may conduct administrative reviews instead of judicial reviews for children in out-of-home placement. Notice must be provided to all parties. An administrative review may not be substituted for the first judicial review or any subsequent 6-month review. Any party may petition the court for a judicial review as provided by law. Committee Notes 1991 Adoption. The rule allows for certain forms of relief pertinent to foster care review. It allows the court to order commencement of a termination of parental rights proceeding if the parents are not in compliance. The court also is also permitted to extend or modify the plan. FORM 8.929. DETENTION ORDER DETENTION HEARING ORDER THE COURT finding that. ….(name of child)….. was taken into custody. …. a.m./p.m. on. ….(date)….., and having reviewed all available information, that probable cause. ….exists/must be further deter­mined….. to believe the child is delinquent within the meaning of the laws of Florida, and FURTHER FINDING that the child is alleged to have committed: ….. an offense that involves the use of a firearm, as defined in F.S. 790.001. ….. an offense during the commission of which the child possessed a firearm. ….. escape or absconding. ….. a violation of probation or conditional release. ….. a delinquent act and has requested in writing through legal counsel to be detained for pro­tection from imminent physical threat to his/her safety. ….. a capital life felony, life felony, or second degree felony that does not involve a violation of F.S. Chapter 893 (Drug Abuse Prevention and Control). ….. a violent third degree felony. ….. a second degree or third degree felony involving a violation of F.S. Chapter 893. ….. a third degree felony that is not also a crime of violence, and has . …. a record for failure to appear at court hearings after being properly notified. . …. a record of law violations prior to court hearings. . …. been detained or has been released and is awaiting final disposition of the case. . …. a record of violent conduct resulting in physical injury to others. . …. been found to be in possession of a firearm. ….. an act of domestic violence, as defined in F.S. 741.28(1), and the following conditions exist: . …. a respite home or similar authorized residential facility is not available; or . …. it is necessary to place the child in detention care to protect the victim from further injury. ….. failure to appear and the child previously has willfully failed to appear for an adjudicatory hearing on the same case and the child was detained within 72 hours of his/her hearing. ….. failure to appear and the child previously has failed to appear at two or more court hearings on the same case and the child was detained within 72 hours of his/her next court hearing. …… ……………………………………………………………… …… ……………………………………………………………… Pick up order for absconding from: . …. home detention . …. probation ….. commitment . …. other:. …………….. Present before the court: ….. the child; …… ….(name)….., Assistant State Attorney; …… ….(name)….., Assistant Public Defender/defense attorney; …… ….(name)….., parent/legal guardian; …… ….(name)….., DJJ juvenile probation officer; …… ….(name)….., Department of Children and Family Services …… ….(name)….., guardian ad litem DJJ Supervision status: ….. None ….. Home detention ….. Probation ….. Committed to. …. level ….. CINS/FINS ….. Conditional release Other court involvement: Dependency:. …. Yes. …. No. ….Unknown Domestic relations:. …. Yes. …. No. ….Unknown Domestic violence:. …. Yes. …. No. ….Unknown The court finds that the child was taken into custody at. …. a.m./p.m., on. ….(date)…… Probable cause that the child committed delinquent acts was: …. found. ….. not found. ….. reset within 48 hours of custody. Risk assessment instrument (RAI) score:. ……… Score amended to:. ……… ….. Meets detention criteria. IT IS ORDERED that the above-named child be: . …. released to the custody of. ….(name)…… ….. held in secure detention for domestic violence charge under section 985.213(2)(b)3, Florida Statutes. The court finds: . …. respite care is not available for the child; and . …. it is necessary to place the child in secure detention to protect the victim from injury. . …. detained by the Department of Juvenile Justice in ….. secure detention; . …. nonsecure detention; or . …. home detention care, with the following special conditions: . …. electronic monitoring. . …. to be screened for transfer to home detention care. . …. to be detained for 72 hours from the time the child was taken into custody so that a determination of probable cause may be made. ….. other, specify. …………………………………………… …… ………………………………………………………………. …… ………………………………………………………………. ….. home detention. . …. home detention with electronic monitoring. . …. secure detention with the following special conditions: . …. attend school regularly. . …. attend evaluation as follows: . …. physical. . …. psychological. . …. ADM. . …. other. ……………….. . …. no (….. harmful) contact with. ….(name)…… . …. drug testing. . …. no drug and alcohol use. . …. other:. ………………. Reasons for court ordering more restrictive placement than RAI score:. ………………. It is FURTHER ORDERED that unless an adjudicatory hearing has begun or a subsequent modification order is entered, the child shall be released no later than 5:00 p.m. on. ….(date)….. to. ….(name(s))….., who is/are . …. the parent(s) . …. a relative . …. foster care . ….. ………………. program . ….. ….him/her….. self . …. other. ……………….. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED under F.S. section 985.215(6) 985.2311, Florida Statutes . …. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100 , or to the clerk of the circuit court, $5 per day for each day the juvenile is in secure detention status. ….. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, or to the clerk of the circuit court, $………. per day. This amount will be no less than $2 per day for secure detention placement or $1 per day for home detention supervision. This maintenance fee is reduced due to a finding by the court of . …. inability to pay, or . …. indigency. ….. The parent or guardian of the child,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, or to the clerk of the circuit court, . …. $….. per day, or . …. the fee is waived. This waiver is based on a finding by the court that the parent or guardian: . …. was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law for which the child is currently detained and is cooperating in the investigation of the offense; . …. has made a diligent and good faith effort to prevent the juvenile from engaging in the delinquent act or violation of law; or ….. has shown that he/she/they would suffer a significant hardship if required to pay any amount. ….. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, $1 per day for each day the child is in home detention. ….. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, a REDUCED rate of $….. per day for each day the child is in detention status. This reduced fee is based on the court’s finding . …. that the parent/guardian was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law for which the child is currently detained and is cooperating in the investigation of the offense; or . …. of indigency or significant financial hardship. The facts supporting this finding are:. ………………. ….. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)…..,. ….(address)….., shall be liable for. ….% of the payment. The parent/guardian of the child,. ….(name)…..,. ….(address)….., shall be liable for. ….% of the payment. ….. The. ….supervision fee/cost of care….. is WAIVED based on the court’s finding . …. that the parent/guardian was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law for which the child is currently detained and is cooperating in the investigation of the offense; or . …. of indigency or significant financial hardship. The facts supporting this finding are:. ………………. If the child’s case is dismissed or if the child is found not guilty of the charges or court order, then the parent/guardian shall not be liable for fees under this order. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED that under F.S. 985.215(2) the child shall be released from detention care by 5:00 p.m. on. ….(date)….., if an adjudicatory hearing has not commenced in this case. Under F.S. 985.215(5)(d), the court may issue a further order extending this detention period. Unless modified by subsequent notice, the NEXT COURT APPEARANCE: ….. will be at. ….(time)….. on. ….(date)….. at. ….(location)……. ….. is to be set. Note: The child’s parent/legal guardian shall advise Clerk’s Office and DJJ of any address change. ….. Department of Juvenile Justice shall transfer the child to. ………………. Detention Center. …… Other:. ………………… DONE AND ORDERED in. ……………. County, Florida at. ……… a.m./p.m. on. ….(date)….. _____________ Circuit Judge Copies to:. ………………. FORM 8.947. DISPOSITION ORDER — DELINQUENCY DISPOSITION ORDER A petition was filed on. ….(date)….., alleging. ….(name)…..,. …. age, to be a delinquent child. The court finds that it has jurisdiction of the proceedings. Present before the court were: . …. the child; . ….. ….(name)….., Assistant State Attorney; . ….. ….(name)….., Assistant Public Defender/defense attorney; . ….. ….(name)….., guardian; . ….. ….(name)….., DJJ juvenile probation officer. At the hearing on. ….(date)….., after. ….entry of a plea/an adjudicatory hearing….., the child was found to have committed the delinquent acts listed below: Count Count Count Count Charge. ………. ………. ………. ……… Lesser. ………. ………. ………. ……… Maximum. ………. ………. ………. ……… Degree. ………. ………. ………. ……… Guilty. ………. ………. ………. ……… Nolo contendere. ………. ………. ………. ……… Nolle prosse. ………. ………. ………. ……… Adjudicated. ………. ………. ………. ……… Adj. withheld. ………. ………. ………. ……… The predisposition report was. ….received and considered/waived by the child…… The court, having considered the evidence and comments offered by those present, having in­quired, and being otherwise fully advised in the premises ORDERS THAT: . …. Adjudication of delinquency is withheld. . …. The child is adjudicated delinquent and . …. committed to. ….a licensed child-caring agency/the Department of Juvenile Justice….. for placement in. ……… risk residential program, for an indeterminate period, but no longer than the child’s. ….19th/21st….. birthday or the maximum term of imprisonment an adult may serve for each count listed above, whichever comes first. The child is allowed. …. days credit for time spent in secure detention or incarceration before this date. The child shall be placed in. ….home detention care. ….with/without….. electronic monitoring/secure detention….. until placement. . …. placed in the serious or habitual juvenile offender program because the child meets the criteria in section 985.31, Florida Statutes. The placement shall be for an indeterminate period but no longer than the maximum sentence allowed by law or the child’s 21st birthday, which­ever comes first. The child is allowed. …. days credit for time spent in secure detention or incarceration before this date. The child shall be placed on. ….home detention with/without elec­tronic monitoring/secure detention….. until placement. . …. placed in a maximum risk program because the child meets the criteria in section 985.313, Florida Statutes. The placement is for an inde­terminate period of time but no longer than the maximum sentence allowed by law or the child’s 21st birthday, whichever comes first. The child is allowed. …. days credit for time spent in secure detention or incarceration before this date. The child shall be placed on. ….home detention ….. with/without ….. electronic monitoring/secure detention….. until placement. . …. The court has orally pronounced its reasons for adjudicating and committing this child. . …. The court retains jurisdiction to accept or reject the discharge of this child from commitment, as provided by law. . …. The child is placed on post-commitment juvenile probation. . …. JUVENILE PROBATION: The child is. ….placed on/continued in….. juvenile probation under supervision of. ….the Department of Juvenile Justice/…..(name)….. for an indefinite period not to exceed the child’s 19th birthday or the maximum term of imprisonment an adult could receive for each count listed above, whichever comes first. . …. DISMISS: The case is dismissed. . …. Disposition on each count is. ….con­current/consecutive…… . …. This case disposition is. ….concurrent/consecutive…. with case number. ………. GENERAL CONDITIONS OF JUVENILE PRO­BA­TION. The child shall abide by all of the following conditions: 1. The child shall obey all laws. 2. The child shall be employed full-time or attend school with no unexcused absences, suspensions, or disciplinary referrals. 3. The child shall not change or leave. ….his/her…. residence, school, or place of employment without the consent of. ….his/her….. parents and juvenile probation officer. 4. The child shall answer truthfully all questions of. ….his/her….. juvenile probation officer and carry out all instructions of the court and juvenile probation officer. 5. The child shall keep in contact with the juvenile probation officer in the manner prescribed by the juvenile probation officer. 6. The child shall not use or possess alcoholic beverages or controlled substances. SPECIAL CONDITIONS OF JUVENILE PRO­BA­TION. The child shall abide by all of the conditions marked below: . …. Restitution is ordered. Parent and child are responsible,. …. jointly and severally. . …. Amount is reserved. . …. $………. to be paid to. ….(name)…… Payments shall begin. ….(date)….. and continue at the rate of $………. each month. . …. The court retains jurisdiction under F.S. Chapter 985 , Florida Statutes, to enforce its restitution order, regard­less of the age of the child. . …. Community Service.. …. hours are to be per­formed by the child at the rate of. …. hours per month. Written proof is to be provided to the juvenile probation officer. . …. A letter of apology to be written by the child to. ….(name)….. within. …. days. The letter must be a minimum of. …. words. . …. A. …. word essay to be written by the child on. ….(subject)…. and provided to the juvenile probation officer within 30 days. . …. The child may have no. ……… contact with victim(s),. ….(name(s))…… . …. A. ….mental health/substance abuse….. evalu­a­tion to be completed by the child within. …. days. The child will attend and participate in every scheduled appointment and successfully attend and complete any and all recommended evaluations and treatment. . …. The parent(s). ….is/are….. to complete counseling in. ……… . …. A curfew is set for the child at. ……… p.m. Sunday through Thursday and. ……… p.m. Friday and Saturday. . …. The child’s driver’s license is. ….suspended/revoked/withheld….. for. ….(time period)…… . …. The child is to complete a. ….detention/jail/prison…. tour within. ….. days. . …. The child will be subject to random urinalysis. . …. The child will be electronically monitored. . …. The child will successfully complete all sanctions of the original juvenile probation order. . …. Other:. ……………………………………………………. . … The child must pay court costs of $…… GUN CHARGES . …. The court finds that one of the above charges involves the use or possession of a firearm and further ORDERS the following: . …. The child’s driver’s license is. ….suspended/revoked….. for. ……… years. . …. The child is to serve. ….5/10…. days in the Juvenile Detention Center. THE COURT FURTHER FINDS AND ORDERS: . …. The child has violated Chapter 794, Florida Statutes (sexual battery) and is ordered to make restitution to the Crimes Compensation Trust Fund under F.S. section 960.28(5) , Florida Statutes, for the cost of the forensic physical examination. . …. The child. ….has been adjudicated delinquent/has entered a plea of no contest/has entered a plea of guilty….. to an offense under F.S. Chapter 794 , or 800, F.S. sections 782.04, 784.045, 810.02, 812.133, 812.135, Florida Statutes, or any other offense specified in F.S. section 943.325 , Florida Statutes, and the child is required to submit blood specimens under F.S. section 943.325 , Florida Statutes. . …. Under F.S. section 985.231(1)(b) , Florida Statutes: . …. the parent/legal guardian,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, $ ………. 5 per day for each day the child resides in a commitment facility is in residential commitment. . …. the parent/legal guardian,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, $1 per day for each day the child is on probation or conditional release. . …. the parent/legal guardian,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, $………. for each day the child resides in a commitment facility. The amount must be no less than $2 per day for place­ment outside the home and $1 per day for other placement. The maintenance fee is reduced to $……… on a finding of inability to pay/indigency. . …. the parent/legal guardian,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, $………. for each day the child resides in a commitment facility. The fee is waived on a finding that the parent/legal guardian. ….was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law and has cooperated in the investigation and prosecution of the offense/has made a good faith effort to prevent the child from engaging in the delinquent act or violation of law…… ….. the parent/legal guardian,. ….(name)….., shall pay to the Department of Juvenile Justice, 2737 Centerview Drive, Tallahassee, FL 32399-3100, a REDUCED fee of $….. per day for each day the child is in the custody of or supervised by the department. This reduced fee is based on the court’s finding: . …. that the parent/legal guardian was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law for which the child is currently before the court and is cooperating in the investigation of the offense. . …. of indigency or significant financial hardship. The facts supporting this finding are:. …………………………. . …. The cost of care/supervision fee is WAIVED based on the court’s finding: . …. that the parent/legal guardian was the victim of the delinquent act or violation of law for which the child is currently before the court and is cooperating in the investigtion of the offense. . …. of indigency or significant financial hardship. The facts supporting this finding are:. ………………………….. . …. The parent/guardian,. ….(name)…..,. ….(address)….., shall be liable for. ….% of the payment. The parent/guardian,. ….(name)…..,. ….(address)….., shall be liable for. ….% of the payment. The child is placed on notice that the court may modify the conditions of. ….his/her…. juvenile probation at any time and may revoke the juvenile probation if there is a violation of the conditions imposed. The parties are advised that an appeal is allowed within 30 days of the date of this order. DONE AND ORDERED in. ….(city)…..,. ……… County, Florida on. ….(date)……, at. …. a.m./p.m. _________________ Circuit Judge Copies to:Proposed PWP amendments The Florida Bar has filed a petition to amend the Rules Regulating the Florida Bar. The Bar proposes to amend the rules to alter the components of the Practicing with Professionalism program and to remove the deferment for certain full-time government employees of the Practicing with Professionalism program. The court invites all interested persons to comment on the Bar’s proposed amendments, which are reproduced in full below, as well as online at www.flcourts.org/sct/sctdocs/proposed.html. An original and nine copies of all comments must be filed with the court on or before November 1, with a certificate of service verifying that a copy has been served on John F. Harkness, Jr., Executive Director, The Florida Bar, 651 East Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300, as well as a separate request for oral argument if the person filing the comment wishes to participate in oral argument scheduled in this case for January 11, 2005. All comments must be filed in paper format and in WordPerfect 5.1 (or higher) format on a DOS formatted 3-1/2 inch diskette. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA AMENDMENTS TO THE RULES REGULATING THE FLORIDA BAR, CASE NO. SC04-914 RULE 6-12.3 REQUIREMENT (a) Course Components. Compliance with BSCR shall include in-person attendance at: (1) the a 1-day Practicing with Professionalism program sponsored by the YLD; and (2) 2 3 elective, basic, substantive continuing legal education programs sponsored by the YLD. (b) Time for Completion. BSCR shall be completed as follows: (1) the Practicing with Professionalism program shall be completed no sooner than 8 12 months prior to or no later than 12 months following admission to The Florida Bar; and (2) the 2 3 elective, basic, substantive continuing legal education programs shall be completed during the member’s initial 3-year continuing legal education requirement reporting cycle assigned upon admission to The Florida Bar. RULE 6-12.4 DEFERMENT AND EXEMPTION (a) Deferment of Practicing with Professionalism Requirement . (1) Deferment Eligibility . A member of The Florida Bar is eligible to defer compliance with the BSCR requirements of rule 6-12.3(a)(1), if: ( 1 A ) the member is on active military duty; ( 2 B ) compliance would create an undue hardship; ( 3 C ) the member is a nonresident member whose primary office is outside the state of Florida; or (4) the member is a full-time governmental employee; or ( 5 D ) the member elects inactive membership status in The Florida Bar. ( b 2 ) Deferment Expiration. A deferment of the requirements of rule 6-12.3(a)(1) as provided under this rule shall expire at the time the member is no longer eligible for deferment. Upon expiration, a member must: ( 1 A ) promptly notify The Florida Bar in writing of the date deferment expired; and ( 2 B ) attend the Practicing with Professionalism program within 12 months of deferment expiration ; and (3) attend 2 elective, basic, substantive continuing legal education programs sponsored by the YLD within 24 months of deferment expiration. (b) Deferment of Basic Level YLD Courses. (1) Deferment Eligibility . A member of The Florida Bar is eligible to defer compliance with the requirements of rule 6-12.3(a)(2) if: (A) the member is on active military duty; (B) compliance would create an undue hardship; (C) the member is a nonresident member whose primary office is outside the state of Florida; (D) the member is a full-time governmental employee; or (E) the member elects inactive membership status in The Florida Bar. (2) Deferment Expiration . A deferment of the requirements of rule 6-12.3(a)(2) as provided under this rule shall expire at the time the member is no longer eligible for deferment. Upon expiration, a member must: (A) promptly notify The Florida Bar in writing of the date deferment expired; and (B) attend 3 elective, basic, substantive continuing legal education programs sponsored by the YLD within 24 months of deferment expiration. (c) Exemption. An exemption from rule 6-12.3(a)(2) shall be granted if: (1) Governmental Practice. An exemption from rule 6-12.3(a)(2) shall be granted if a member has been continuously engaged in the practice of law for a Florida or federal governmental entity as a full-time governmental employee for a period of at least 6 years. (2) Foreign Practice . An exemption from rule 6-12.3(a)(2) shall be granted if a member has been continuously engaged in the practice of law (non-governmental) in a foreign jurisdiction for a period of 5 years ; (2) within the immediate 3-year period, the member , can demonstrate completion of 30 hours of approved continuing legal education ; within the immediate 3-year period, and (3) the member can attest s that the continuing legal education completed has reasonably prepared the member for the anticipated type of practice in Florida. Comment In [ Case Citation ] the Supreme Court of Florida accepted changes to rule 6-12.3 that were proposed by The Florida Bar and which, effective [ insert Implementation Date ], made lawyers who were engaged in a government practice for 6 years or more additionally exempt from the continuing legal education component of the Basic Skill Course Requirement. Further changes within those bar proposals, however, eliminated for any “full-time governmental employee” the deferment of the Practicing with Professionalism (hereinafter PWP) component of the BSCR. To accommodate that latter change, the bar requested – and the court accepted – a scheduled implementation of the revision whereby all such government lawyers who had benefitted from the deferral as of its [ insert Implementation Date ] elimination, would still be entitled to defer the Practicing with Professionalism component of the BSCR as long as they continuously remained in government practice. In addition, the court accepted the bar’s willingness to administer that [ Implementation Date ] change so that any government lawyer then deferred from PWP and who had already or thereafter served 6 years or more in a governmental practice would be granted exemption from PWP. This comment memorializes those accommodations agreed to by the bar in its administration of these [ insert Implementation Date ] rule changes .Family law procedures amendments The Florida Bar’s Family Law Rules Committee has filed an out-of-cycle petition to amend the Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure to create new rule 12.525, Motions for Costs and Attorneys’ Fees. The court invites all interested persons to comment on the committee’s proposed amendment, which is reproduced in full below, as well as online at www.flcourts.org/sct/sctdocs/proposed.html. An original and nine copies of all comments must be filed with the court on or before November 1, with a certificate of service verifying that a copy has been served on the committee chair, Judge Henry H. Harnage, 73 West Flagler Street, Suite 817, Miami 33130-4762, as well as a separate request for oral argument if the person filing the comment wishes to participate in oral argument which may be scheduled in this case. All comments must be filed in paper format and in WordPerfect 5.1 (or higher) format on a DOS formatted 3-1/2 inch diskette. IN THE SUPREME COURT OF FLORIDA AMENDMENTS TO THE FLORIDA FAMILY LAW RULES OF PROCEDURE (RULE 12.525), CASE NO. SC04-1652 Rule 12.525 Motions for Costs and Attorneys’ Fees Florida Rule of Civil Procedure 1.525 shall not apply in proceedings governed by these rules. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit seeks applications from all highly qualified persons for a 14-year appointment as U.S. bankruptcy judge for the Middle District of Florida at Tampa.The salary is $145,452 annually.Further information and an application are available on the court’s Web site at www.ca11.uscourts.gov/humanresources, or may be obtained from the Office of the Circuit Executive at 56 Forsyth Street, NW, Atlanta, GA 30303, phone (404) 335-6535, and from the clerk of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit and the clerks of the district and bankruptcy courts for the Middle District of Florida.Applications for the position must be submitted personally by potential nominees and must be received no later than November 10.Appointments to be filled in Decemberlast_img read more

Christine Riordan: Setting Adelphi Apart

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Dr. Christine Riordan made history in 2014 when she was named the first female president of Long Island’s oldest private coeducational university, Adelphi University in Garden City. She recently caught up with us to share her thoughts on Adelphi’s impact on the community, how giving back is part of the mission and why personalized education is their hallmark. Our conversation was edited and condensed.Long Island Press: What is your vision for the university?Christine Riordan: Two years ago, we went through a comprehensive process and laid out the mission and our vision. In a nutshell, we’re striving to personalize higher education in a way that’s meaningful and purposeful for each student.LIP: What sets Adelphi apart from other colleges and universities?CR: The quality of the programs, hands-on learning, small classes, and our personalized approach toward education are really hallmarks for us.LIP: The Bridges to Adelphi Program has been praised as a national model for helping students with autism continue their higher education. Are there plans to expand it to meet growing demand?CR: I’m really proud of all of our pathway programs. I think it speaks to our core strength, which is helping all our students succeed regardless of learning differences. We do pay attention to the demand for that program as well as another program that we have called The Learning Resource Program, for students with any kind of learning need. We try to scale as much as we can. I’m really excited about The Bridges program because we start it in high school, so students can come the summer before college starts to help with that transition. And then we take them through the college experience with mentoring and tutoring and social support. We also now have a partnership with a nonprofit that’s helping place our students in employment situations.LIP: Adelphi recently got a $1 million pledge to fund its new Faculty Leadership Fellows initiative that prepares faculty for careers as college administrators. Why is this important?CR: The Viret Family Faculty Leadership Fellows Program was implemented to help faculty members who are interested in going into leadership at university really start to understand how a university operates. We began this program two years ago and the faculty members go through pretty extensive professional development for a semester. They meet with every single one of the executives in all the different functional units to learn about everything from the budget to alumni relations to fundraising to academic operations to how facilities operate. It has gone exceedingly well.LIP: Is there anything I should have asked but didn’t?CR: One of the things that’s pretty important to understand is the impact that Adelphi has on our community. There are four big areas where we’re going to continue to emphasize. One is giving back. We have the Carnegie Foundation classification for community engagement, which means our students are extraordinarily involved in the  broader community through volunteer activities. One of our trustees also gave a gift to begin what we call the Jaggaer Community Fellows program that places about 150 students in nonprofits every summer for internships. The second thing is we have over 500 strategic partnerships with various organizations throughout the state focusing on education, research and employment opportunities, and that’s going to be a major initiative for us going forward. The third thing that a lot of people don’t know is we provide a lot of services to the community. We provide an audiology clinic, as an example, that will help people with their hearing aids or do hearing assessments. We have a lot of community services. And then the last thing is we generate over half a billion dollars of economic activity in the community. All told, our economic impact on the community is pretty great and Adelphi is really focused a lot on developing strong relationships as we move forward.Adelphi at A GlanceStudent population: 7,978Faculty: 349Student to Faculty ratio: 10:1Undergraduate tuition: $37,170Graduate tuition: $36,370 – $45,940Undergraduates receiving institutional scholarship award: 86%Percent receiving financial aid: 92.9%last_img read more

Women in leadership positions in credit unions: Invest in yourself

first_imgWhen we think about starting a business, taking a promotion or deciding how to get to that next level, we sometimes feel we are superwomen. We can do it all, maybe not all at once, but we’ve got this. Isn’t that the battle cry we tell each other? “You’ve got this~” …and while that is true, why do we feel we need to do this alone? Why can’t we be real and authentic and let others know we need help?I remember my first meeting when I started out in the Insurance world. The room was packed and although everyone seemed friendly enough, I didn’t know what I didn’t know and wasn’t even sure what questions I should ask. Instead, I listened. I was sure that if I concentrated on the speakers and focused in on their words, I would simply get it…maybe through osmosis.We were about 20 minutes into the meeting and one of the top leaders talked about a new program in the health insurance arena. It was a PPO. He said it numerous times and people were smiling, shaking their heads in a positive direction and some were high fiving each other. People, Productivity and Opportunity were the first 3 words that came to mind, but I didn’t think that was right.  Maybe Profitability, Persuasion and Organization? This was 1990 so there were no smart phones to look this up. Our cell phones were…phones. After about 45 minutes of my mind coming up with different combinations of PPO words, the man of the hour asked if anyone in the room was unfamiliar with the term PPO. This was my first meeting and I was the only female in the room, and I had to decide should I raise my hand or not. It seemed like hours had passed since he asked the question, even though it was about 30 seconds.  I was just about to bravely raise my hand, knowing the looks I would receive, when he decided to just blurt it out…Preferred Provider Organization. I did have the O correct and 1 out of 3 wasn’t too bad, was the thought that went through my head.The reason I tell you this story is because from that moment on, I understood the value of investing in myself. I found mentors in the company that would explain things to me and help me in my journey to navigate this unfamiliar world. As I started to show success, they identified me as an emerging leader and I again had to find those that would support me within the company and then I hired a coach to fill in the other pieces. Investing in myself was the way I was going to create my future as a leader in the company. That always makes me think of a story about investing in yourself. I was at the airport and my flight was delayed.  Nothing new was what I thought, and others were visibly annoyed. I was standing next to a woman and we started chatting. The conversations always comes back to “What do you do?” She worked for a large agency and I told her I am a speaker, Executive Coach and Leadership and Sales trainer. She immediately told me that she has never worked with a coach and wouldn’t ever consider it. Her boss works with a coach, but she again said it wasn’t for her. I asked why and she explained that when you work with a coach, they want you to do more things than what you need to do. They expect more from you. She didn’t want to be promoted or go any higher in the company, so a coach was not for her.  I thought she is probably correct and reminded myself how important and beneficial it is to invest in myself.The truth is, investing in yourself is extremely powerful. Here are some benefits you receive when you do:* You are letting people know that the way you treat yourself is the way they should treat you. Respect is earned. Once others see that you respect yourself, you can earn theirs as well.* You know what you need better than anyone else. Don’t wait for anyone else’s approval of how to care for you. * You are demonstrating that you prioritize who and what is really important to you. * You become a magnet, attracting the right people and opportunities into your life. You know what is right for you and what is not. You become unafraid to say no to your deal breakers. You do not compromise your values or integrity.When you take care of yourself first, you will accomplish and enjoy more professionally and personally. By eliminating negativity in your life, you will have more time and energy to complete the projects that can help propel you and your business to the next level.Remember, taking care of yourself is the best selfish thing you can do. 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Judy Hoberman Men and women sell, manage, recruit and supervise differently.  Judy Hoberman, creator of “Selling in a Skirt”, shares essential insights about gender differences and how to embrace and use those … Web: www.sellinginaskirt.com Detailslast_img read more

Alex Trebek’s Final ‘Jeopardy!’ Episode to Air on Christmas Day

first_imgTrebek was diagnosed with cancer in March 2019 and continued to host the long-running quiz show for 18 months. He detailed his battle with the disease in his memoir, The Answer Is, which was published in July.“I’ve lived a good, full life, and I’m nearing the end of it. I know that,” he wrote, telling readers that he was “not afraid of dying.”Nearly one year into his cancer battle, the Canada native revealed that he had rehearsed the ending for his final episode of Jeopardy!, which he began hosting in 1984.- Advertisement – “The show is not announcing plans for a new host at this time,” the press release stated after many Twitter users called for Jeopardy! The Greatest of All Time champion Ken Jennings to take over.Jeopardy! announced earlier on Sunday that Trebek died at home while surrounded by family and friends.“This is an enormous loss for the Jeopardy! staff, crew and all of Alex’s millions of fans,” executive producer Mike Richards said in a statement. “He was a legend of the industry that we were all lucky to watch night after night for 37 years. Working beside him for the past year and a half as he heroically continued to host Jeopardy! was an incredible honor. His belief in the importance of the show and his willingness to push himself to perform at the highest level was the most inspiring demonstration of courage I have ever seen. His constant desire to learn, his kindness, and his professionalism will be with all of us forever.”- Advertisement – “What I would do on that day is tell the director, ‘Time the show down to leave me 30 seconds at the end. That’s all I want,’” he said on Good Morning America in January. “I will say my goodbyes and I will tell people, ‘Don’t ask me who’s going to replace me because I have no say whatsoever. But I’m sure that if you give them the same love and attention and respect that you have shown me, then they will be a success and the show will continue being a success. And until we meet again, God bless you and goodbye.’”Trebek is survived by his wife, Jean Currivan Trebek, and his children, Nicky, Matthew and Emily.Listen to Watch With Us to hear more about your favorite shows and for the latest TV news! One last go-around. New episodes of Jeopardy! featuring Alex Trebek will air through Christmas Day, Sony Pictures Television announced on Sunday, November 8, after the longtime host’s death.The production company said in a press release that Trebek was last in the studio on October 29, just 10 days before he lost his battle with stage IV pancreatic cancer at the age of 80. His final episode of the Merv Griffin-created game show is set to air on December 25.Alex Trebek’s Final ‘Jeopardy!’ Episode to Air on Christmas DayAlex Trebek. Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/Shutterstock- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Combating pandemic planning fatigue

first_img(CIDRAP Source Weekly Briefing) – Business people convinced of the possibility of an influenza pandemic agree: Convincing reluctant managers, organizing continuity planning, and educating employees can be challenging.But if getting better prepared for a pandemic is tough, business managers say, keeping prepared is tougher.It’s bad enough, they agree, to have to convince reluctant managers and educate busy employees that a pandemic will be unlike any other hazard a company might face, like earthquakes, hurricanes, or terrorism. Such events are local or regional and occur over minutes to hours. Recovery resources from other areas of the country can be accessed quickly and the recovery process begun–even in the face of physical destruction.But for those responsible for private-sector pandemic preparedness, what remains untested and unclear is how companies and organizations will respond. How stable, for example, will today’s public utilities be? Will companies supplying critical parts or services be able to deliver? How many employees will come to work and over what period? The unknowns can be so confounding as to bring preparedness activities to a halt.Another challenge is finding reliable sources and information to act on for both meaningful planning and for delivering company information campaigns and training.After that, they say, comes the truly hard part: Sustaining the planning effort over the long haul.Experts say that preparing well for a catastrophic event takes time, thought, and repetition–but the more time that elapses, and the more repetitions employees go through, the more likely it is they will develop planning fatigue.Pan flu war games”This is a very serious issue,” said Len Pagano, president and CEO of the SafeAmerica Foundation, a Georgia-based nonprofit organization that has staged pandemic-planning business summits in Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia. “If you come up with a plan, and then over a year you don’t touch the plan, you won’t only forget key points in the plan–you’ll begin to think the whole issue isn’t very important.”But keeping up awareness of the possible consequences of a pandemic–a global event that could last 8 to 12 weeks in any one location, cause up to 24 months of disruption around the globe, and kill 200,000 to 1.9 million just in the United States, according to the US government–is as essential as it is challenging.Pagano and the SafeAmerica Foundation recently landed on a new idea: They are staging a war game, with flu as the enemy.The exercise will last a week and take place in 2 to 6 plants belonging to a Fortune 100 heavy-industrial company that asked not to be identified for competitive reasons. The company will ask its workers to follow the social-distancing techniques that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends as a first-line defense. SafeAmerica will observe employees to gauge compliance, then report to the company’s management what recommendations were followed or ignored.An actual pandemic, of course, will last months and mean that employees will be subjected to many other stressors (loss of loved ones, trouble finding food or routine drugs for themselves or family members) that will change how employees respond during the real event. But if the experiment is successful, Pagano said, it will deliver what scenario exercises lack: the energy and creativity provoked by a real-time challenge.Keeping plans freshKeeping fresh in pandemic planning is a preoccupation for Steve Bergfeld, vice president of corporate services and administration at Baxter Healthcare Corp. of Illinois, part of Baxter International Inc.Baxter makes a range of medications and medical devices, including home dialysis solutions. The company is in a category the government calls critical infrastructure: 14 business sectors (from food production to energy to banking to information technology) that must keep functioning during a crisis in order for the United States to keep running.”As I go around and talk to my colleagues, everybody is saying the same thing: How do you keep this [planning] as a front-burner issue when we have so many other priorities and so much demanding our time,” Bergfeld said.Bergfeld was brought to Baxter 10 months ago to head a threat-management team of 23 people. The company’s process is arduous: monthly meetings to rank facilities worldwide against a list of “accountabilities”; regional audits that score facilities on 7 aspects of pandemic and disaster planning; on-site inspections; and tabletop exercises. Yet “I am always looking for new tools, new resources . . . the next creative way to keep this in front of people,” Bergfeld said.Mega-retailer Target Corporation, which has 7,000 employees just in its Minneapolis headquarters, formed a 30-person pandemic response team a year ago to work with its existing business continuity experts, who, up to then, had chiefly anticipated store closures due to natural disasters such as hurricanes as well as technology crises such as crashes in the company’s worldwide electronic networks.”What we do for business continuity prepares us for pandemic planning, and pandemic planning becomes a scenario within business continuity that we haven’t addressed in the past,” said Birch Holt, Target’s manager of business continuation.The pandemic team, Holt said, draws broadly from throughout the company, including representatives from crisis management, merchandising, and government affairs in addition to the pre-existing business continuation department.They began meeting in January 2006, starting with face-to-face, twice-monthly gatherings of at least an hour, initially mapping out plans for each major division, using pandemic flu–related information from the CDC (www.cdc.gov) and the World Health Organization (www.who.int) as well as a private risk-information company. With most of Target’s divisional plans now written and under review by senior management, the team has cut back to hour-long, face-to-face meetings once a month.Target will shortly hold its first pandemic tabletop exercise. Participants will represent each company sector that has prepared written plans. The results, Holt said, will expose new vulnerabilities to think through.Holt acknowledges that written documents (no matter how thought-out and granular) are not enough. On a board near his desk, he keeps a saying he attributes to World War II general and President Dwight D. Eisenhower: “In preparing for battle, I have found that plans are useless, but planning is indispensable.”last_img read more