Who are Amazon Prime’s rugby pundits?

first_imgSam Warburton, who has captained the British & Irish Lions on two tours as well as led Wales a record 49 times, is part of the team.On the mic: Former Lions skipper Sam Warburton is a pundit for Amazon(Getty Images)He is joined by former England captain Dylan Hartley, ex-Scotland skipper John Barclay and another man who has led Wales in Scott Quinnell.Former South Africa wing Bryan Habana, who is the second highest try-scorer in Test history with 67, is also one of the pundits along with former France flanker Serge Betsen, ex-England wing Topsy Ojo, Wales and Lions centre Jamie Roberts, who is still playing for the Dragons, and Ireland and Racing 92’s Simon Zebo.Former internationals David Flatman, Paul Grayson, Jim Hamilton, Shane Horgan, Benjamin Kayser, Rory Lawson and Danielle Waterman are also involved in Prime’s coverage, as is Olympic gold medal-winning Fiji coach Ben Ryan. The team: Gabby Logan with Shane Horgan, Topsy Ojo, Dylan Hartley, Scott Quinnell, Serge Betsen and John Barclay (Amazon) A look at those providing expertise for the Autumn Nations Cup coverage LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Who are Amazon Prime’s rugby pundits?Amazon Prime Video is taking its first steps into the rugby market by covering the new eight-team Autumn Nations Cup tournament.The online streaming service is broadcasting 14 of the 16 Autumn Nations Cup matches live in the UK, 13 of them exclusively.If you already have Amazon Prime you will be able to watch the matches as part of your package, while new members can sign up to Amazon Prime for £7.99 a month – and as you can cancel at any time you could take it out just for the course of the Autumn Nations Cup, which runs from 13 November to 6 December.Related: Autumn Nations Cup FixturesExperienced broadcasters Gabby Logan and Mark Durden-Smith are fronting Amazon Prime’s coverage while match commentary will come from Conor McNamara, Andrew Cotter, Jamie Lyall and Nick Heath. But what about the ‘talent’ they have as pundits? We take a look…Who are Amazon Prime’s rugby pundits?Amazon Prime Video have recruited a host of former international captains to offer their expertise and viewpoint during the Autumn Nations Cup. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

‘Carnage’ of gun violence must stop, bishops say

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Advocacy Peace & Justice, House of Bishops Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 13, 2013 at 3:08 am I commend the Bishops on their endorsement of the Episcopal Church taking a leadership role in the conversation to reduce gun violence in its various forms, recognizing the wide spectrum this covers. And while we’re at it I would encourage us to take a stand on violence of all kinds. I f we cannot lead and encourage this conversation, then we are saying that there is no hope to make improvements. I cannot imagine the Episcopal Church (and we as individuals) turning its back, sitting on its hands, on a matter like this. Let us look clearly at, and listen carefully to one another, and work together to reduce this violence. ‘Carnage’ of gun violence must stop, bishops say Retreat concludes with call for ‘new conversation’ that challenges U.S. gun violence Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Comments are closed. Featured Events thomas mauro says: Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Bath, NC Gun Violence, Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Rector Albany, NY Comments (4) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ [Episcopal News Service] Saying that they “lament and have cried over the widely reported mass shootings” in the United States, the Episcopal Church’s House of Bishops said March 12 that they are also “outraged by the too often unseen and unacknowledged daily massacre of our young people in cities such as Chicago, Newark, Baltimore, Port-au-Prince and Tegucigalpa.”“This carnage must stop,” bishops said in a “Word to the Church” issued from the Kanuga Conference Center in Hendersonville, North Carolina (Diocese of Western North Carolina) at the end of their March 8-12 meeting.The bishops said they “embody a wide variety of experiences and perspectives with respect to firearms,” including as “hunters and sport-shooters, former members of the military and law enforcement officers.“We respect and honor that we are not of one mind regarding matters related to gun legislation. Yet we are convinced that there needs to be a new conversation in the United States that challenges gun violence,” they said. “Because of the wide variety of contexts in which we live and our commitment to reasoned and respectful discourse that holds together significant differences in creative tension, we believe that The Episcopal Church can and must lead in this effort. In fact many in this church are already doing so, for which we thank God.”A specific commitment “to lead a new conversation in our nations as to the appropriate use and legislation of firearms” and to commit to “specific actions to this end,” is, the bishops said, in keeping with their episcopal ordination vows to “boldly proclaim and interpret the Gospel of Christ, enlightening the minds and stirring up the conscience.”They also called all Episcopalians “to pray and work for the end of gun violence.”The theme for the bishops’ meeting, which was styled as a retreat, was “Godly leadership in the midst of loss” and the sessions included prayer, daily Bible study, reflection and worship.Some bishops initially viewed the theme as a “downer,” Diocese of Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley, vice president of the house’s planning committee, said during a press briefing towards the end of the meeting. That feeling changed as reflections from various bishops opened up the theme, he said.“Without any coordination between those bishops, they really touched on the same things,” Ousley said, namely the call to bishops to “be present; we are to stay connected in relationship and that that really is what leadership is.”The meeting was the first since General Convention last met in July 2012, and the first meeting of the bishops outside of convention since their last retreat during March 2012. The bishops generally meet in both March and September in the years when General Convention does not meet.A total of 137 bishops registered for the retreat, according to retired Ohio Bishop Suffragan Ken Price, who is secretary of the house. Eleven of the bishops were new since the last retreat meeting, according to Price, who said in the briefing that the deaths of eight bishops were also noted.“The house is in continuous flux but in the 18 years that I have been coming, I can honestly say that this meeting gave more space, more time to tend to ourselves than any other one,” Price said of the retreat format. “I think we’re all going to leave refreshed and grateful for the time of reflection.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori echoed that sentiment, calling the gathering a time of “good fellowship and deep conversation” and describing the March 12 afternoon session as “the most minimal business meeting I can recall.”“We did do the business of tending to our souls and that is a great blessing,” she said during the briefing.While the bishops were meeting, it was announced that a written agreement had been forged and accepted by Jefferts Schori over complaints from the Diocese of Quincy Standing Committee against Bishops Peter Beckwith (Springfield), Bruce MacPherson (Western Louisiana) and Edward Salmon (South Carolina), and from the Diocese of Fort Worth Standing Committee and an individual complainant against Bishops Maurice Benitez (Dallas), John Howe (Central Florida), Paul Lambert (Dallas), William Love (Albany), Daniel Martins (Springfield), Edward Salmon (South Carolina), and James Stanton (Dallas).The “conciliation process,” also described as a mediation process, took place under Title IV.10 of the church’s canons.“’Conciliation’ is a bizarrely inappropriate word to describe what has happened,” Martins wrote after the March 8 release of the agreement. “Today, I think it’s safe to say that all nine of us are processing some degree of anger and are feeling substantially alienated from those who brought the charges against us. We feel manipulated and victimized. We are nowhere near happy about this outcome, even though we stand by our decision to accept the Accord.”Martins, who attended the retreat at Kanuga, also called the tone of the agreement “derisive and hostile” and “abusive.Asked if the accord and Martins’ reaction came up during the retreat, Ousley said the meeting’s tone “was one of being very attentive to our relationship across the spectrum.”He said “minimal questions” were raised when the accord was reported to the house. “Our focus was not on that, but rather on how much we value our relationships with one another and a recognition that we have all experienced loss” as some members of the Episcopal Church have chosen to leave.The gathering involved a lot of informal conversations among bishops, Diocese of Kansas Bishop Dean Wolfe said during the briefing, adding that he did not have a sense of the feelings Martins described from the bishops involved in the process. “There was a lot of good humor, good conversation and a sense that we were moving forward and not looking backward,” he said.Jefferts Schori noted that the conciliation process is included in the church’s Title IV disciplinary canons and that “it’s a step towards reconciliation; it doesn’t achieve full reconciliation but it’s a step in that direction.”The Episcopal Church’s Office of Public Affairs issued daily accounts that provided a brief overview of the bishops’ discussions and activities at Kangua. Those accounts are here.Members of the public and the news media were not allowed to observe the sessions. Some bishops blogged and tweeted during the retreat.Among those tweeting, using the hashtags #HOB2013 and #HOB13, were Diocese of Central Florida Bishop Greg Brewer, Diocese of Washington Bishop Marrian Budde, Diocese of Vermont Bishop Tom Ely, Diocese of Texas Bishop Andy Doyle, Diocese of Connecticut Ian Douglas, Diocese of Texas Bishop Suffragan Jeff W. Fisher, Diocese of New Hampshire Bishop Rob Hirschfeld, Diocese of Maine Bishop Steve Lane, Diocese of Rhode Island Bishop Nick Knisely, Diocese of Springfield Bishop Dan Martins, Diocese of Arizona Bishop Kirk Smith,  Diocese of Western Louisiana Bishop Jake Owensby and Diocese of Atlanta Bishop Robert Wright, who noted that Knisely had advised him that he should start tweeting.In past meetings, some bishops have raised issues of confidentiality in response to their colleagues tweeting and blogging about their conversations. Wolfe said during the briefing that the bishops have agreed not to tweet from confidential portions of their meetings. In other parts of the meeting “we’re enjoying a more relaxed set of rules,” he said.“It’s just important we have some time where bishops feel that they can share creatively and openly without fear that their words will be broadcast to the world,” Wolfe said.Price agreed that “we need those times when we just talk with one another,” but, “on the other hand, when we really do want to communicate, we have lots of tools to do it really effectively and we’re catching up with the world.”He noted that many of the newer bishops “are younger and have been using various forms of social media very comfortably for a long time.” He added that one informal gathering involved some of those bishops teaching others about how to more effectively use social media.Ousley said the bishops’ agreement also calls for using social media “primarily to report our own words and our own impressions, rather than the words coming from others.Tweets using #HOB2013, the most widely used of the two, can be found here.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ CAROLINE ROPER-DEYO says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN David Cherney says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 12, 2013 Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Dan B. Odenweller says: March 12, 2013 at 9:16 pm Yes . . . I agree the carnage should stop . . . and it would if you were concentrating on character and spiritual development. People who are walking with Jesus don’t go on shooting ramages.Pob bendith * All blessings,Caroline Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS March 12, 2013 at 8:31 pm This completely worthless statement is further evidence of this church’s persistent effort to joust with windmills. We need to focus on problems we can actually solve instead of these worthless efforts to feel good. There has never been one instance of a firearm ever hurting or killing someone all by itself. People kill and cripple each other, and always will until the second coming. Our faith community needs to get real before we become less mainstream than we already are. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC March 13, 2013 at 3:24 am I cannot help but wonder how this issue might have progressed had the Church focused its effort on the ten commandments and specifically on:Thou shall not kill – Imagine the broad impact of these simple words, in our inner cities, in the middlke east, and in Africa.But no, it cannot be a failure of ours, let us continue to blame the inanimate object, and strive to eliminate any form of penalty for violating the norms of society, and church. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

Empeño interreligioso para corregir un defecto de la Ley de…

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 30, 2013 Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Episcopal News Service] Mientras en el Congreso sigue la disputa sobre la Ley de Atención Médica Asequible, el Grupo de Pensión de la Iglesia y la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales de la Iglesia Episcopal están instando a los legisladores a aprobar un proyecto de ley para rectificar lo que ven como un fallo en la ley relacionado con la Iglesia.La Ley de Atención Médica Asequible [ACA, por su sigla en inglés] tiene por objeto  que el cuidado preventivo de la salud —incluida la planificación familiar y servicios afines— resulte más accesible para los estadounidenses sin seguros.En la actualidad, los individuos y familias de bajos y medianos ingresos que. Por otra parte, no tienen derecho a un seguro de salud público o patrocinado por un empleador, podrán solicitar subsidios en la forma de créditos contributivos para ayudarles a comprar un seguro de salud a través de las nuevas bolsas de seguros de salud recién establecidas. La inscripción en los planes que ofrecen esas bolsas deben comenzar el 1 de octubre y la cobertura y los subsidios comienzan en enero.Sin embargo, según la ley y sus actuales reglas de aplicación, a diferencia de la mayoría de los planes de salud, los planes de salud de la Iglesia no pueden ofrecerse en las bolsas de seguros de salud estatales o federales. Por consiguiente, clérigos y laicos inscritos en los mismos y que tendrían derecho por razón de sus ingresos, no tienen acceso a esos créditos contributivos basados en sus primas.El Grupo de Pensión de la Iglesia y la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales apoyan la Ley del Plan de Salud para la Iglesia de 2013 (Proyecto de Ley del Senado 1164), la cual permitiría a los empleados el derecho a seguir comprando su seguro a través de los planes de la Iglesia y el tener acceso a los créditos contributivos por los que pueden optar los empleados que compran sus seguros en los planes de salud comerciales a través de bolsas, conocidas también como el Mercado de Seguros de Salud.Sin embargo, el proyecto de ley no contempla un tratamiento contributivo especial para clérigos y empleados laicos que tienen derecho a créditos semejantes a los que la AFL-CIO solicitó recientemente para sus miembros. La federación del trabajo quiere planes de salud sindicales con patronos múltiples, y también mantiene que queden exentos de impuestos las contribuciones a los planes de salud, un beneficio que de otro modo se le ofrece a los individuos que reciben los créditos contributivos a través del mercado. El gobierno de Obama ha denegado la solicitud de la AFL-CIO.El Grupo de Pensión de la Iglesia calcula que alrededor del 6% de los clérigos y el 16% de los empleados laicos que están inscritos en la actualidad en los planes del Consorcio Médico de la Iglesia Episcopal [The Episcopal Church Medical Trust] tendría derecho a un “importante crédito contributivo sobre la prima si la ley se aprobara”, dijo a ENS Frank Armstrong, vicepresidente primero y actuario principal del Grupo de Pensiones de la Iglesia, en una respuesta por escrito a preguntas enviadas por correo electrónico.El consorcio Médico ofrece una variedad de planes de salud a clérigos y empleados laicos episcopales. El consorcio Médico administra esas ofertas, mediante contratos con importantes compañías aseguradoras (tales como UnitedHealthcare) y les paga una tarifa por tener acceso a sus redes de proveedores y reclamar pago de servicios.Armstrong hizo notar que un empleado puede tener derecho a créditos contributivos de primas si él o ella tiene un ingreso familiar entre el 100% y el 400% del Nivel Federal de la Pobreza (aproximadamente de $24.000 a $94.000 de ingreso anual para una familia de cuatro en 2014, según información que puede obtenerse aquí.)Además, deben poder demostrar que no tienen acceso a un seguro médico asequible a través de su empleador. La cobertura se define como asequible cuando la contribución que se exige del empleado por él solo no excede el 9,5% del ingreso familiar. El empleado también tendría que comprar cobertura a través de las bolsas del cuidado de la salud e incluirlo en su declaración de impuestos (conjunta si está casado) para obtener el crédito contributivo.Armstrong dijo que “poquísimos” participantes del Consorcio Médico pagan la totalidad o la mayor parte de sus primas del seguro de salud. “De hecho, la mayoría de los empleadores pagan la totalidad o la mayor parte de las coberturas de salud individuales tanto para clérigos como para empleados laicos, razón por la cual son tan pocos los que tienen derecho a créditos contributivos sobre las primas conforme a la orientación [federal] actual”.Jayce Hafner, analista de política nacional de la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales de la Iglesia, dijo a Episcopal News Service que “parece desafortunado que la Iglesia Episcopal, una organización que trabajó tanto a favor de la aprobación de la ACA, deba ser excluida de [todos los] beneficios de esta ley”.“Si la Ley del Plan de Salud para la Iglesia 2013 no se aprueba, algunos empleados de la Iglesia Episcopal perderán algún incentivo económico para inscribirse en planes de salud que están específicamente diseñados para su profesión”, añadió ella, tales como un beneficio especial del Consorcio Médico que cubre la participación en “agrupaciones de colegas” facilitado por clérigos y consejeros autorizados de la Iglesia para tratar con presiones vocacionales y profesionales.La defensa de la Iglesia a favor del acceso universal al cuidado de la salud se remonta por lo menos a 1994, cuando la Convención General aprobó la Resolución A057, la cual, en parte, le hace saber a la Iglesia que ese acceso “a servicios de salud económicos y de calidad [debe] considerarse necesario para toda la población”.La Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales envió una carta el 26 de septiembre a los miembros del Congreso en que les instaba a aprobar la Ley del Plan de Salud de la Iglesia.El Grupo de Pensión de la Iglesia ha publicado en su página web información acerca de la propuesta  Ley del Plan de Salud de la Iglesia y un modelo de carta para que los participantes la usen para escribirles a sus senadores federales instándoles a apoyar el proyecto de ley.Dos senadores demócratas, Mark Pryor, de Arkansas y Chris Coons, de Delaware, presentaron la Ley del Plan de Salud de la Iglesia en junio. Coons la definió como el arreglo “de un problema de sentido común”.La Alianza Eclesiástica —una coalición de 37 juntas de beneficios de iglesias que abarca todas las denominaciones protestantes históricas, dos ramas del judaísmo y escuelas e instituciones catolicorromanas— la cual ofrece beneficios de atención sanitaria a más de un millón de clérigos y trabajadores laicos, también apoya el proyecto de ley del Senado. La Iglesia Episcopal pertenece a esa alianza.Sin embargo, las posibilidades de que el proyecto de ley resulte aprobado están sujetas a la lucha política que rodea la ley federal de atención médica que sus adversarios han apodado “Obamacare”.“Es un escenario complicado en el Congreso. Algunos miembros del Congreso reconocen que la ACA, si bien es efectiva y global, necesita algunas mejoras y ellos están tratando de allanar esos obstáculos”, dijo Hafner. “No obstante, hay otros miembros del Congreso que se oponen vehementemente a la ACA, y que preferirían mantener la ley tal como está mientras laboran por derogarla, en lugar de esforzarse en perfeccionarla. Estos actores están haciéndole difícil a otros miembros el actualizar, extender y avanzar la ACA”.Y el 12 de septiembre en su 41ª. votación contra la Ley de la Atención Médica Asequible, en todo o en parte, la Cámara de Representantes aprobó la Ley de No Subsidios Sin Verificación (H.R. 2775). El proyecto de ley se opone a una regulación promulgada en julio por el Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanitarios (HHS) del gobierno federal que daba alguna flexibilidad a las bolsas de seguros de salud administradas por los estados cuando examinaban si las personas tenían derechos a créditos contributivos sobre las primas de seguros. Los republicanos dijeron que la flexibilidad permitiría que personas sin méritos tuvieran derecho a los créditos, y el gobierno de Obama dice que la regulación ha sido malinterpretada. La ley se espera que muera en el Senado.Entre tanto, el liderazgo de la mayoría republicana en la Cámara de Representantes han dicho que está dispuesta a que el gobierno federal deje de funcionar, al rehusar autorizarlo a contraer préstamos una vez pasado el último día de septiembre, a menos que se prive a la ACA de su financiación. Una vez más, es improbable que esa movida sobreviva una votación en el Senado dominado por los demócratas. El 25 de septiembre, el Senado hizo avances hacia la aprobación de una versión del proyecto de ley de la Cámara de Representantes que mantiene al gobierno funcionando, pero no suprime la financiación de la ACA.Otros impactos posiblesAlgunos observadores han predicho que si los créditos contributivos no se extendieran a los clérigos y empleados laicos con derecho a ellos, los clérigos y empleados laicos de bajos a medianos ingresos intentarán abandonar los planes [de salud] denominacionales y comprarán cobertura de seguros en las bolsas. Otros se han preguntado si algunos empleadores pondrían énfasis en que harían esto para mitigar sus propios costos de cobertura de seguros [de salud].“Si un empleado pude presentar un certificado de que él o ella tiene derecho a un crédito contributivo de su prima de seguro [de salud], esto se consideraría una exclusión permisible [del Plan de Salud Denominacional]”, dijo Armstrong del Grupo de Pensión de la Iglesia, reiterando que la CPG cree que “poquísimos” clérigos y empleados laicos episcopales tendrán derecho a los créditos.Armstrong hizo notar que los participantes del Consorcio Médico de la Iglesia Episcopal que opten por comprar cobertura en el mercado perderán cualesquiera contribuciones que actualmente esté haciendo su empleador para cubrir el costo de su seguro; y los pagos de las primas hechos por el empleado hacia la cobertura del mercado no pueden hacerse sobre las ingresos brutos.Además, según Armstrong, esas personas que tienen derecho por razón de sus ingresos, posiblemente tendrían que “comprar más caro” a fin de obtener un plan de mercado que ofrezca la misma cobertura que el empleado tiene ahora a través del Plan de Salud Denominacional. La mayoría de los planes del Consorcio Médico están clasificados como “de oro” o “de platino” y también ofrecen beneficios secundarios tales como cobertura oftalmológica, planes de ayuda al empleado y servicios de promoción de la salud, pero lo créditos contributivos de las primas se basaran en los costos de los planes de “plata” del mercado.(Una breve explicación de los “niveles metálicos” de los planes puede encontrarse aquí.)“Existen también otras consecuencias impositivas y económicas a considerar”, dijo Armstrong. “Sugerimos enfáticamente que cada empleado hable con un asesor financiero o de impuestos durante el proceso de decisión”.Entre tanto, según Armstrong, “el Consorcio Médico no está excesivamente preocupado respecto a la posibilidad de los empleadores de la Iglesia que insten a sus empleados a excluirse el DHP a fin de atenuar los gastos del empleador” dado el pequeño número de empleados que se espera participen.“Es más, a diferencia de las compañías que tienen un carácter lucrativo, el Consorcio Médico tiene presente los mejores intereses de la Iglesia y de nuestros participantes y creemos que los empleadores de la Iglesia son del mismo sentir”, agregó él.Un asunto relacionado con los enfoques de implantación de la Ley de Atención Médica Asequible es una parte de la ley que permite a los empleadores con menos del equivalente a 50 empleados de jornada completa, durante un período específico, dejar de ofrecer cobertura de salud a sus empleados sin ser penados conforme a la cláusula de la ACA sobre Responsabilidad Compartida del Empleador. El gobierno de Obama ha diferido la puesta en práctica de esta cláusula hasta 2015.Armstrong dijo que la entrada en vigor de esa cláusula no sobreseería los requisitos canónicos de la Resolución A177 de la Convención General de 2009, la cual estableció el Plan de Salud Denominacional e impuso que se le proporcionaran beneficios de salud a los clérigos y empleados laicos que tuvieran derecho a ellos.Entérese de más al respectoPara más información sobre cómo funcionan los créditos contributivos de las primas, visite esa parte de la página web HealthCare.gov del gobierno federal.La Fundación de la Familia Kaiser tiene una calculadora de subsidios aquí.El Centro para Prioridades del Presupuesto y la Política tiene un documento sobre preguntas frecuentes respecto a los créditos contributivos sobre las primas aquí.El Sindicato de Consumidores ha creado folletos, estado por estado, en los que explica cómo funcionan los créditos contributivos y cómo tener derechos a ellos en cada estado. Esa información también se encuentra disponible aquí.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerricenter_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Empeño interreligioso para corregir un defecto de la Ley de la Atención Médica Asequible relacionado con la Iglesia La Iglesia respalda los empeños para ayudar a algunos empleados a obtener créditos contributivos de las primas de sus seguros de salud Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Press Release Service An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

41 St. Paul’s students earned AP Scholar Awards

first_img41 St. Paul’s students earned AP Scholar Awards Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS People Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Posted Sep 2, 2014 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [St. Paul’s Episcopal School – press release] St. Paul’s Episcopal School in Mobile, Alabama, is honored to announce that forty-one students were listed among the highest scorers in the country by their performance in their AP courses and exams.These AP Scholars have demonstrated college-level achievement through rigorous classes accredited by the College Board’s Advanced Placement Program (AP) which provides willing and academically prepared high school students with the opportunity to take college-level courses to earn college credit. The College Board recognizes several levels of achievement based on students’ performance on the AP Exams.AP Scholar: Granted to students who receive grades of 3 or higher on three or more AP Exams.Kendall A. Bailey, Virginia G. Cottrell*, Nina C. Crawford*, Zoe S. Donalson*, Marissa F. Donovan*, Taylor L. Evans, William R. Foster, Hallie A. King*, Jonathan Landry*, Klaudia J. Larson*, Rachel McCaslin*, Whitney N. Myers*, Ellis K. Nobles, Matthews O’Connor*, Zachary B. Parker, Brockton M. Payne*, Rebecca M. Pober*, Graham Reeves*, Caroline E. Scott, Richard Smith, Virginia M. Vichi-Miller*, Benton G. Weinacker, Susan D. Wettermark. AP Scholar with Honor: Granted to students who receive an average grade of at least 3.25 on all AP Exams taken, AND grades of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams. Taylor A. Bahos*, Ryan Cox*, Kellsey L. Daggett*, Matthew A. D’Alonzo, Victoria M. Falkos, George R. Irvine*, Wade K. Naritoku*AP Scholar with Distinction: Granted to students who receive an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP Exams, AND scores of 3 or higher on five or more of these exams. Abigail L. Blankenship*, Conner J. Denton*, Holly N. Friedlander*, Alexandra L. Goodwin*, Louis A. Henry*, Katherine B. Jeffries*, John F. Kavula*, Brewer G. Kirkendall*, Jessica R. Knezha*, Katherine M. Steadman*, Danielle C. Williamson*National AP Scholar: Granted to students in the United States who receive an average score of at least 4 on all AP exams and scores of 4 or higher on eight or more of these exams. Abigail L. Blankenship*, Danielle C. Williamson*To learn more about these scholars and the Advanced Placement curriculum at St. Paul’s Episcopal School, contact Morgan Berney, Associate Director of Marketing & Communications at 251.461.2145 or [email protected]ile.net. Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Press Release Service Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

Hacer de la reconciliación y la evangelización la nueva normalidad…

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Hacer de la reconciliación y la evangelización la nueva normalidad de la Iglesia Piden a los episcopales vivir el llamado de la Convención a nuevos enfoques y actitudes Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing El obispo primado Michael Curry discute planes emergentes para la labor de reconciliación racial durante la reciente reunión del Consejo Ejecutivo en Fort Worth, mientras la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, lo escucha. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.La Convención General fijó el verano pasado una agenda audaz para que los episcopales laboren en pro de la reconciliación racial y la evangelización; quehacer que ahora ha comenzado de manera algo inesperada.Por ejemplo, los líderes de la Iglesia han iniciado la obra de la reconciliación racial escuchándose atentamente unos a otros, en lugar de pedirles de inmediato a los miembros del personal que crearan nuevos programas. Y la nueva y continua labor de evangelización de la Iglesia incluye planes, por ejemplo, para reunir y apoyar a los evangelistas ocultos de la Iglesia y revivir los avivamientos.El presupuesto trienal 2016-2018 de la Convención incluye $3 millones para iniciar nuevas congregaciones con un énfasis en las comunidades hispanas, $2,8 millones para la obra de evangelización y también financia una nueva e importante iniciativa de $2 millones sobre justicia y reconciliación raciales.Laborar en pro de la justicia y reconciliación racialesEl verano pasado, la Convención intentó mover el foco de la Iglesia hacia los problemas raciales mediante la Resolución C019, que le dio al Obispo Primado y a la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados un extraordinario mandato a “conducir, dirigir y estar presente para garantizar y dar cuenta de la labor de justicia y reconciliación raciales de la Iglesia”, teniendo como objetivo especial la injusticia racial sistémica.La Resolución C019 reconoce que el racismo continúa plagando la sociedad y la Iglesia a pesar de los reiterados empeños de capacitación antirracista y otras iniciativas de justicia y reconciliación raciales, entre ellas más de 30 resoluciones de la Convención General que se remontan a 1952, y llama a la Iglesia a comenzar de nuevo.La decisión de encomendarles la tarea de supervisar la puesta en vigor de la resolución a los funcionarios ejecutivos, en lugar de a un comité o a un equipo de trabajo es inusual, pero “impactante” en palabras de Anita George, presidente del Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Promoción Social e Interconexiones del Consejo Ejecutivo.George, haciendo un comentario, el 27 de noviembre, durante una reunión conjunta de su comité y el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Finanzas para la Misión, dijo que el hecho de que la Iglesia decidiera abordar este asunto y abordarlo a partir de su liderazgo “es lo que algunos de nosotros hemos estado pidiendo durante mucho tiempo: que cuando los líderes hablan la Iglesia escucha”.La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, habla sobre una reunión que ella y el obispo primado Michael Curry, a la izquierda de la foto, sostuvieron en febrero sobre el tema de la reconciliación racial. Los dos intervinieron en una reunión conjunta de los comités de Finanzas y Promoción Social del Consejo Ejecutivo. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Primero, los líderes tuvieron que discernir por dónde empezar. A Curry y la presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, se sumaron los vicepresidentes de la Cámara de Obispos Mary Gray Reeves y Dean Wolfe, el vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados Byron Rushing y el director ejecutivo de la Convención General Michael Barlowe, in Austin, Texas, los días 3 y 4 de febrero, para discutir los rumbos del trabajo que pedía la Resolución C019.Durante esa reunión, escucharon a Dianne Pollard, diputada por Nueva York, que presidió el Comité de Justicia Social y Política de Estados Unidos de la Convención General, el cual auspició la resolución. Representantes de las diócesis de Atlanta y Nueva York describieron la labor de antirracismo en sus comunidades. La Rda. Stephanie Spellers. Canóniga del Obispo Primado para la Evangelización y la Reconciliación que se incorporó al personal del Obispo Primado en diciembre; Charles A. Wynder Jr., misionero para la Justicia Social y el Compromiso con la Promoción Social; Heidi J. Kim, misionera para la Reconciliación Racial y el Rdo. E. Mark Stevenson, misionero de la Pobreza Nacional, apoyaron la labor de la reunión.Y lo más importante, Curry dijo que el Consejo Ejecutivo, en lugar de trazar un plan de acción sobre el supuesto de que el grupo sabía adonde ir, los participantes se escucharon los unos a los otros. “Contamos las dimensiones de nuestras propias historias raciales”, remontándonos a la niñez en algunos casos, apuntó.“Hubo un período de intercambio muy eficaz”, añadió, “y fue a partir de ahí que empezamos a pensar: ¿cómo podemos ayudar a que la Iglesia participe en un nivel más profundo?”Es en ese nivel profundo que ocurrirán los cambios, sugirió Curry. Tomándose el tiempo de escucharse unos a otros los relatos de sus experiencias tanto dentro de la Iglesia como en el mundo, les dijo él a los dos comités del Consejo, “a largo plazo puede fructificar tanto para nuestra Iglesia y nuestro país como para los varios países en que la Iglesia Episcopal está representada”.El bosquejo de un plan para implementar la C019 “surgió de escucharnos mutuamente las historias y de oír el dolor y la esperanza de nuestra cultura a través de nuestras propias historias”, afirmó.Entre esos bosquejos se encuentran las siguientes posibilidades:* Convocar una reunión denominacional para discutir la justicia y la reconciliación raciales, semejante a la reunión de 2011 para debatir las bendiciones a parejas del mismo sexo, o tal vez una serie de reuniones más pequeñas en toda la Iglesia. Spellers dijo durante la reciente reunión del Consejo que estas reuniones no serían para que la gente presentara maneras de gastar los $2 millones. Se centrarían, por el contrario, en “escuchar por dónde Dios se mueve, dónde está la sabiduría, cuáles son las mejores medidas a tomar y, francamente, cómo tiene lugar esta transformación, según prestamos atención atentamente a la manera en que llegamos a reconciliarnos”.* Identificar otras vías de compartir nuestras historias, fomentar “relaciones de reconciliación”, escuchar a los vecinos de la Iglesia (tanto en el ámbito de la Comunión Anglicana como de otras denominaciones) y aumentar las oportunidades de formación para todas las edades.* Contemplar el llevar a cabo un censo para tener una comprensión más clara de la composición demográfica de la Iglesia y de su participación tradicional y actual en los sistemas de injusticia racial. “El hecho simple es que no conocemos la composición racial —y por ende, la composición de géneros o edades— de la Iglesia Episcopal, y hablar de reconciliación, hablar de transformación, hablar de corregir errores históricos resulta difícil cuando uno no sabe quién está aquí”, dijo Spellers a los comités.* Identificar los actuales recursos y ministerios de justicia y reconciliación raciales de la Iglesia, acaso por medio de una auditoría. La Iglesia Episcopal ha pedido disculpas por varios aspectos de su conducta a lo largo de los años, pero, dijo Spellers, tan importante como eso es que la gente oiga, “lo que necesariamente no hemos hecho es escuchar a toda la Iglesia respecto a lo que hiere, a lo que ha estado mal, históricamente y en la actualidad, cómo seguimos participando en sistemas de injusticia y disparidad racial como Iglesia… cómo nos hemos dedicado a la labor de hacer las cosas bien”.George, miembro del Consejo, dijo que el plan de que “toda la Iglesia escuche y luego hable” es importante debido a las historias que surgen. “Todas esas historias son esenciales, todas esas historias deben oírse”, afirmó.Y eso llevará tiempo“Esto en verdad no es un programa trienal; esto es a largo plazo”, dijo Jennings en la reunión de los comités de finanzas para la misión y promoción social e interconexión durante la reunión del Consejo del 26 al 28 de febrero. “Resulta claro que no se trata de [un asunto] predominante o exclusivamente blanco-negro; [resulta claro] que tenemos una Iglesia multicultural, multiétnica, multinacional y en consecuencia que los problemas en torno a la justicia y reconciliación raciales con extremadamente complejos”.Durante esa misma reunión de comités, David Bailey, obispo de Navajolandia, advirtió que llevar a cabo esa labor exigiría un enérgico liderazgo a través de la Iglesia. “Gústenos o no”, una gran parte del liderazgo en una iglesia que se llama “episcopal” (lo cual significa que tiene obispos) descansa en la Cámara de Obispos y el éxito depende de si sus miembros “deciden que las cosas avancen”.Curry y Jennings dijeron que se proponen enviar pronto una carta a los obispos y diputados invitándoles, y por extensión a toda la Iglesia, a incorporarse a la labor.Tess Judge, la miembro del Consejo que preside el Comité de Finanzas para la Misión, instó a Curry y a Jennings a encontrar medios de obtener información sobre los planes de cada convención diocesana y a instar a esos participantes a hablar al respecto en los lugares de donde provengan. “Necesitamos que esto llegue a los bancos de las iglesias” dijo ella.Tal como los líderes de la Iglesia dejaron aclarado en el Consejo Ejecutivo, la obra de la justicia y la reconciliación raciales y la evangelización a la cual la Convención también llamó a la Iglesia están entrelazadas”.‘¿Qué les parece hacer de la evangelización la nueva normalidad?’Al Obispo Primado y a otras personas de la Iglesia les gustaría desterrar a los libros de historia la época en que la evangelización en la Iglesia Episcopal era un oxímoron.Curry dijo que él podía “recordar con mucha claridad los tiempos en que la evangelización estaba en un segundo plano y no se tomaba en serio”, Ahora la Iglesia Episcopal está lista “a dar un paso para reclamar nuestra herencia como cristianos y seguidores de Jesús en la tradición anglicana y episcopal” para encontrar y formar nuevos discípulos, le dijo a otro grupo de miembros de comités del Consejo Ejecutivo.Anita George, presidente del Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Promoción Racial e Interconexiones , mientras escuchaba hablar a la Rda. Stephanie Spellers, canóniga del Obispo Primado para la Evangelización y Reconciliación, en una reunión reciente de comités del Consejo Ejecutivo. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Hubo un tiempo, dijo Spellers durante su sermón en el Consejo Ejecutivo, cuando un comité de compromiso comunitario o de misión era una rareza; ahora es inusual que una parroquia no tenga un grupo así.“¿Qué les parece que hagamos de la evangelización la nueva normalidad?”, sugirió ella.Así como siempre hubo episcopales haciendo labor de compromiso comunitario y de misión con o sin comités que los respaldaran, hay evangelistas que ya trabajan en la Iglesia. “Están allí, están ocultos; podemos acogerlos”, dijo Spellers.Uno de los primeros pasos para hacer eso, oyó el Consejo, será una cumbre sobre evangelización, planeada tentativamente para los días 18 y 19 de noviembre en Dallas y coauspiciada por el Movimiento Adelante [Forward Movement] y a la que seguiría una conferencia denominacional.“La idea es crear una red de profesionales de la evangelización y otras personas a través de nuestra Iglesia que serían capaces de llevar el Movimiento de Jesús a sus comunidades locales”, explicó la Rda. Susan Snook, presidente del Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Ministerio y Misión Locales, durante la reunión del Consejo.Hay planes también de adaptar y compartir materiales formativos de evangelización a través de la Iglesia y crear nuevos materiales donde se necesiten.Y existen los avivamientos. “Los avivamientos son parte de nuestra historia”, dijo Spellers de la Iglesia Episcopal. “Vamos a reclamar esa parte de nuestra historia”.Si bien esas reuniones tendrán un predicador dinámico, también se ocuparán de la capacitación de equipos locales “para practicar la evangelización relacional y para escuchar atentamente junto con sus vecinos, condiscípulos, amigos y compañeros de trabajo”.Se incluirían lo que Spellers llamó artistas y músicos de barrio y “personas de la localidad que darían testimonio”.“Habrá incluso un llamado al altar, pero esta vez a la hermandad de la Iglesia y a la acción vecinal”, dijo ella en su sermón.Puesto que el avivamiento no debe ser sólo una experiencia de exaltación única, Spellers dijo que habría un seguimiento para vincular a los recién llegados a iglesias y ministerios, fortalecer esos ministerios y buscar sitios donde pudieran plantarse nuevas comunidades de fe.La evangelización no sólo tiene lugar cara a cara en estos días y la Convención financió una importante iniciativa de evangelización digital. El Equipo de Trabajo sobre la Movilización de las Redes Sociales para la Evangelización facilitará la creación de nuevos materiales concebidos para preparar a “narradores digitales para Jesús”, dijo Spellers durante la reunión del Consejo.La Oficina de Comunicaciones de la Iglesia está encargada de administrar un renovado empeño de evangelización por Internet que no se encargará de promover nuevos contenidos, sino más bien tratar de encontrar a personas que tienen “grandes interrogantes sobre Dios y la fe, acerca de la comunidad” valiéndose de herramientas tales como Google AdWords, explicó Spellers. Este empeño tendrá lugar tanto en inglés como en español.La Convención también concibió una “red denominacional para la plantación de congregaciones y la capacitación y captación de plantadores”; la Resolución D005 asignó $3 millones para esta labor, contemplando más de $1 millón para el ministerio latino/hispano.Está en marcha el trabajo para actualizar el proceso de solicitud de subvenciones para la plantación de iglesias y más zonas de empresas de misión. Ese nuevo proceso debe darse a conocer en breve.Este trabajo también conlleva medios de aumentar la responsabilidad y la evaluación, y el hacerse más proactivo en la captación de personas y lugares, dijo Spellers. Y el presupuesto incluye un nuevo misionero para que la capacidad de plantar nuevas iglesias se agregue al empeño del Rdo. Thomas Brackett, misionero de la Iglesia Episcopal para el comienzo de nuevas iglesias e iniciativas de misión.Snook describió el nuevo puesto como “otro obrero de la viña” y Spellers dijo que “sin más infraestructura, sin aumentar la capacidad del personal, estábamos lanzando la simiente del dinero de las subvenciones en un suelo árido y poco profundo”.Los que participan también quieren desarrollar una “comunidad de práctica” entre los plantadores de iglesias y otros evangelistas porque “puede ser una labor muy solitaria”, dijo Snook al Consejo.Los miembros del Consejo escucharon una y otra vez que, en toda la labor interconectada de evangelización y reconciliación racial, es esencial la colaboración de toda la Iglesia y con personas de otras iglesias que piensen igual.“Este no es un momento de competencia”, dijo Spellers en su sermón. “Los tiempos de la competencia entre denominaciones se acabaron. Es el momento de la colaboración en pro del Movimiento de Jesús”.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 11, 2016 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Executive Council, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ General Convention 2015, Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA General Convention, Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

Video: Archbishop Welby speaks on human sexuality issues at ACC-16

first_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID ACC16, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Consultative Council, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Human Sexuality, Video Comments (3) Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ April 19, 2016 at 2:06 pm I wonder why the Church at large is so divided over what are essentially private matters, and is less ocncerned about spreading the Gospel, which is our commission from Jesus. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI J C Stromberger says: Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Martinsville, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events April 21, 2016 at 8:52 am J. C. I agree 100%. Also called o feed the hungry, visit the sick, etc. etc. Submit a Press Release Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Video: Archbishop Welby speaks on human sexuality issues at ACC-16 April 22, 2016 at 4:09 pm ALL of God’s words are important including those against having sex outside of the covenant of marriage. That is referred to has fornication and can be found throughout the old and new testament. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest R. O. Bidell says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Anglican Communion, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Posted Apr 18, 2016 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Submit an Event Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Ernie Hammel says: Rector Bath, NC Comments are closed.last_img read more

Global response to pope’s call to pray for South Sudan…

first_img Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Posted Feb 19, 2018 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Africa, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Sudan & South Sudan Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Global response to pope’s call to pray for South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo Director of Music Morristown, NJ center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Anglican Communion News Service] Anglican provinces around the world have responded positively to Pope Francis’ call for an ecumenical day of prayer and fasting for peace, with a particular focus on South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo. The pope made his call during his traditional Angelus address to crowds in Saint Peter’s Square in the Vatican Feb. 4. The call was endorsed that week by a number of senior Anglicans, including the acting primate of the Anglican Church of South Sudan, chair of the Anglican Consultative Council, the secretary general of the Anglican Communion and the deputy director of the Anglican Centre in Rome.Read the entire article here. Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Anglican Consultative Council, Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

US Supreme Court refuses to hear South Carolina Episcopal Church…

first_img June 11, 2018 at 5:20 pm After 81 years, I continue to be look for the teachings of Jesus that tell us that some people should be excluded from the family of God. Tags June 11, 2018 at 3:10 pm If there is one church doctrine that is coming thru loud and clear it is “It’s our property so move out!” This is an immutable position unlike all others concerning church doctrine. Bruce Garner says: cynthia seddon says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release S.R.Price says: Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Doug Desper says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET June 11, 2018 at 6:55 pm Bruce Garner hit a home run in his analysis of why TEC is shrinking.Sometimes we act more like the curator of a historical museum rather than those charged with ” go ye therefore into the world”.Look for a radical change in that sitback mindset to emerge from this General Convention and this presiding Bishop.Episcopalians in tents and street corner revivals? Don’t bet against it!! S.R.Price says: william dailey says: Rector Tampa, FL Bruce Garner says: June 11, 2018 at 9:05 pm “This particular group of old white guys just can’t grasp the concept that they do not get to control things just because of their race and gender….not anymore. Getting these little boys to share is a daunting process.”This doesn’t sound like the message of “love” preached by Bishop Curry at St. George’s Chapel. It sounds rather “smug” — like someone hates old white men.The Supreme Court is not a court of “error” but may choose which cases to hear and which not to hear. Many of petitions for hearing are filed, but few are accepted as involving an important Constitutional or legal issues that needs to be addressed by the Court.The property lawsuits across the nation are all about “money.” The lawsuits have nothing to do with “gender justice,” “old white men” or “love.” The results of the property rights litigation is decided based upon secular property law. Jesus’ teachings or doing what is just or moral is irrelevant to the Justices.Congregants must learn that in the Episcopal Church, while they may own the soul of the Church, the sanctuary structures are not theirs, but legally belong to the local Bishop, usually as a “Corp Sole,” to do with as he sees fit, regardless of the fact that it was their money, their faith and their efforts that built and maintained the local church. Churches can be sold out from under a congregation, and the loved ones resting in the columbarium relocated or returned, just as Bishop Bruno tried to do in Newport Beach, California. The TEC is legally in the right in SC as well as in California and other states. Predictions of its demise are premature, since the Church now has many empty buildings to convert to cash to fund its agendas. Political activism is a thirsty beast.Is the TEC morally and theologically in the right? That is a different question. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK June 12, 2018 at 11:54 am The Supreme Court decision may turn out to be meaningless unless the Church attorneys are very aggressive in followup.The dissident Bishop’ s defiant statement yesterday indicates he believes he has enough political power with the Dorchester County court charged with enforcing the decision to tie things up indefinitely in more litigation.SCEpiscopalians website reported that judge is a former member of the law firm repressing Lawrence.. June 11, 2018 at 5:24 pm Amen my sibling in Christ, AMEN! I’ve been looking as well. I am convinced that no matter how hard we look, that is not a doctrine we will find in His teachings. So simple yet so overlooked.Thank you for posting that. Jim Bryant says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest June 12, 2018 at 10:24 am Anger,bitterness,name calling, worshiping objects( buildings). I can’t for the life of me understand why young people don’t want to join us and become followers of Jesus. June 13, 2018 at 7:29 pm S.R., regardless of the setting for the teaching (a question about divorce), it remains that Jesus clarified the God-ordained pattern of bonding: 1 man/1 woman. The operative measure is what was in “the beginning”. Our meddling and adaptation of that twice-affirmed truth is an error. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA June 12, 2018 at 5:11 pm I left the Episcopal church,because nowhere in scripture do I find marriage between same sex people to be the will of God. I do not hate homosexuals, but when my bishop ruled that clergy were to perform marriages between them, I could not stand by and agree.The presiding bishop may preach love,but love of God demands obedience to His laws. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID June 13, 2018 at 6:50 pm By omitting the preceding 3 verses you have managed to turn a denunciation of heterosexual divorce into a condemnation of homosexual relationships,something Jesus was not doing here.This kind of ” twist” is one reason the Episcopal Church has decided on a position of neutrality on the issue of same sex relationships. Featured Events June 11, 2018 at 5:23 pm The Supreme Court made the right decision. Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Rev’d Canon H. Milton Cole says: Doug Desper says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 11, 2018 Rector Shreveport, LA June 14, 2018 at 10:36 am Wait, you think people haven’t walked away from TEC feeling disappointed and unaffirmed? What do you think this court case was all about? Philip Jones says: June 11, 2018 at 5:22 pm The “property and assets” is not and never has been The Episcopal Church. The Episcopal Church has always been the people who sought to follow the teachings of Jesus and love their neighbor as they love themselves without exception or exemption. The breakaway folks have never learned this. They want to exclude people when that was never the intent of Jesus in His teachings.The true irony here is that this really isn’t about the things it is purported to be about, such as faithfulness to the Scriptures, the BCP, the so-called teachings of the church. It has always been about the power and control Lawrence and many of the clergy who followed him want to exercise over not just property, but how people think and worship and relate to each other. That has NEVER been the polity of The Episcopal Church. The very ability to ask questions, difficult questions, is what drew me away from the theological tyranny of the Southern Baptist Church over 50 years ago. This particular group of old white guys just can’t grasp the concept that they do not get to control things just because of their race and gender….not anymore. Getting these little boys to share is a daunting process.So Mark et al, why don’t you return what was never yours to take and let both “sides” of this get back to some effort of GOING OUT and spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ instead of waiting for people to come to us in our nice buildings…that is the real reason for our decline in numbers and that of many mainline churches. People are no longer coming to us. Our funerals out number our baptisms. And thus we shrink. Jesus told the 70 to go OUT. He told the 12 to go OUT. At His ascension he told those looking to go OUT into the world. He never said sit in the pew and wait for them to come to you. We built it but they ain’t coming! Time to move on with the Jesus Movement!! July 8, 2018 at 12:50 am “By omitting the preceding 3 verses…” You mean the verses that say “and a man shall leave his father and mother and cleave to his boyfriend and they shall become one flesh?” Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group June 15, 2018 at 11:36 am Some agree with your reasoning,some don’t.(By the way I personally don’t think gay marriage is a good idea for gay people.Copying another culture’a institutions rather than creating your own is not always the best path).If one adhere’a to your concept of marriage,then any sexual contact that is not for the purpose of propagating children is an abomination inside or outside of marriage,which takes us back to the divisive debate in our Church in the 1930’s over birth control..Sorry,not going there with you.Meanwhile,back at the Oasis the legitimate Bishop of S.Carolina has outlined a reasonable game plan for bringing the disassociated parishes back into the real Diocese of S.Carolina and reported that lay leaders in some of the parishes including vestry members are beginning to establish contact. Property, Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ June 13, 2018 at 12:26 pm I think people sometimes confuse ancient Hebrew civil law with the law of God.Unless it’s recorded as coming frothed actual Gospel message of Jesus in Matthew,Mark,Like,or John I approach it with an open mind W. Lewis says: June 13, 2018 at 2:53 pm Try this, S.R. It’s not ‘Hebrew civil law’, but from the mouth of our Lord, what we could rightly consider the law of God: (By the time of Jesus humanity had tried every kind of bond and relating other than 1 man/1 woman. That original design of marriage had devolved into polygamy, concubines, and howls to be divorced, which Moses granted to the people. Jesus observed this human-created mess and when questioned about divorce took the moment to give a further elaboration about what marriage should be (Matthew 19:4-8). Hold on, though, because Jesus quotes word for word from Genesis 2 to return us….underline that….return us to the original design of human bonding found in the first pages of Scripture:4) “Haven’t you ever read,” he replied, “that at the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female,’ 5) and said, ‘For this reason a man will leave his father and his mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’? 6) So they are no longer two, but one. Therefore, what God has joined together, let no man separate.” 7) “Why then,” they asked, “did Moses command that a man give his wife a certificate of divorce and send her away?” 8) Jesus replied, “Moses permitted you to divorce your wives because your hearts were hard. But it was not this way from the beginning”. This teaching on Marriage was entirely omitted from the Episcopal Marriage Study. Odd, that a Jesus Movement would exclude Jesus. Odd that one of the few times that Jesus quoted and elaborated the Scripture would be left out in answer to the important question of our time on what a valid marriage is in God’s design. Excuses are made that this is a new time and that Jesus would understand us not being confined to the original design of Genesis 2 and that its OK to liberalize and bless what Jesus never did. What a plank to walk! Twice Jesus established what was right by returning to the time of “the beginning”. If the Lord returned humanity of his time to original design of 1 man/1 woman then woe be to those who declare that He was in error and that they know much better. July 8, 2018 at 1:15 am It is important to belong. We all need that. But the church is a hospital, not a club. And everyone who goes there is sick and in need of healing. I don’t want a hospital where the doctors pat me on the head, tell me they love me, but don’t give me a prescription for a cure for my ailment. If I have cancer I don’t want a doctor who says, “I love you,” but doesn’t tell me what I have to do to be healed. I want a church that is going to help transform me into the image of Christ, not condone my appetites and sins. Christ said “be ye therefore perfect.” How is that going to happen if I’m surrounded by clergy who celebrate my sins instead of helping me overcome them? June 12, 2018 at 7:04 am As the “old white man” who wrote the above, I stand by it. It isn’t that I don’t love these people at all. They are, from my experience with most of the “breakaway” groups, only interested in maintaining control that was theirs solely by virtue of gender and race. There are few women clergy in any of the breakaway groups and a tiny number of anyone of color. The world is changing. Those we are to serve in the name of Christ has changed. And like it or not, the organization of our part of the Jesus Movement does indeed vest ownership in all church property at the churchwide level. Someone above noted that we act like curators. The moral question to me is whether we should continue to dump thousands of dollars a year into virtually empty buildings while not addressing the needs of those who live within the shadows of those buildings? I think that is contrary to the teachings of Jesus. It is certainly poor stewardship of God’s resources. What some call political activism, others see as working toward bringing the beloved community into being where all of God’s children are the equals in our eyes that they are in God’s eyes. So, yes, as an old white guy, we should not be in any position just on the basis of our gender and race. We ought to be there to be a voice of prophesy bringing the love of God to those who truly thirst. June 11, 2018 at 7:00 pm No one has ever been able to explain why revisionists keep getting to move the goal posts to accomplish what they perceive as truth. Truth is not subjective, but received. Secondly, since when does “respecting the dignity of all persons” equate to submitting to whatever is demanded? The Jesus Movement….the one recorded in the Gospels …. never defined the Good News like that. People, even sincere ones, sometimes walked away from Jesus both disappointed and unaffirmed. That such a possibility rarely occurs in the Episcopal Church should give pause to what we call The Jesus Movement. June 11, 2018 at 2:29 pm Those “breakaway” churches were supposedly going to be “just a few who don’t want to be with us”. Fifteen years and millions of litigation dollars later, that “few” has grown to tens of thousands who have announced that following behind the culture to validate and bless its demands is tedious and tiresome, and contrary to a Gospel mandate to announce Good News and repentance. Our General Convention continues to paint the Church into a corner, particularly by jettisoning the present Prayer Book teaching which affirms the marital bond of 1 man/1 woman. Now that Marriage has been unanchored from Matthew 17/Genesis 2 to accommodate the culture, what will the Church say when 3 people want to marry? It’s already a cultural trend out there. General Convention is about to set fire -again- to the already dry timbers of the Church to validate another human itch and bless cohabitation (adultery for those followers of the Ten Commandments). Cohabitation? Sure. Did Christ call us to validate culture or to challenge and transform it? It’s an honest question to ask, “Who are the real ‘breakaways’? Those who change doctrine to validate cultural trends, or those who have been loyal to Church teachings as found in our present Book of Common Prayer?”Two-thirds of our present members on the rolls are just sitting it out each week as our Average Sunday Attendance shows. Somehow I sense that when the Church just mimics a fallen world that its members see nothing much to get excited about. Curate Diocese of Nebraska John Hobart says: US Supreme Court refuses to hear South Carolina Episcopal Church property case Breakaway group vows to continue legal fight Comments are closed. Jim Bryant says: S.R.Price says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img June 14, 2018 at 10:47 am S.R., it appears that you are making an argument for marriage revision from the silence of Jesus. The contrary is much more solid; that He reaffirmed the original design by quoting Genesis 2. We are often being told that the Spirit is doing a new thing. I don’t sense that the Holy Spirit will bring contradiction and confusion. If we believe that the Holy Spirit speaks to the Church today, then how much more so during the time of the original apostles, since Jesus promised to them that He would guide them in all things? That witness is found in the New Testament scripture. If our bishops believe in Apostolic Succession, then that means that the faith is passed on from the apostles and their experience of God through the Holy Spirit’s leading. It is without doubt that same gender marriage was not a part of the life of the apostolic age, and the successors to the apostles must be very careful to claim that the Holy Spirit is now contradicting that witness. Secondly, if we believe, as stated in the Creeds, in the Lordship of Christ we will be on sure ground to rely on the certainty of His re-affirmation of original design in Genesis 2.In short, Scripture and Apostolic Tradition are not with those who have redesigned marriage, and I find it strange that Matthew 19/Genesis 2 were entirely left out of the Marriage Study, which weakens its credibility.That said, I believe that gay folks have a welcome and vital place in the Church, but cannot demand what we cannot grant. That marriage is God’s original and first institution means that it has been designed perfectly. S.R.Price says: Doug Desper says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Jim Bryant says: Doug Desper says: Jim Bryant says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] The United States Supreme Court refused June 11 a petition by a group that broke away from the Episcopal Church in South Carolina asking it to review a state court ruling that said property, assets and most of the diocese’s parishes must be returned to the Episcopal Church and its recognized diocese, The Episcopal Church in South Carolina.The petition for a writ of certiorari from a group that broke away from the Episcopal Church in South Carolina asked the court to consider “whether the ‘neutral principles of law’ approach to resolving church property disputes requires courts to recognize a trust on church property even if the alleged trust does not comply with the state’s ordinary trust and property law.”The breakaway group said in its Feb. 13 petition that the majority of the South Carolina Supreme Court justices did not take the “neutral” approach.The high court justices discussed the case (17.1136) during their June 7 conference and denied the request without comment on June 11.Episcopalians in South Carolina have been reorganizing their common life since late 2012, after then-Bishop Mark Lawrence and a majority of clergy and lay leadership said that the diocese had left the Episcopal Church. They disagreed with the wider Episcopal Church about biblical authority and theology, primarily centered on the full inclusion of LGBT people in the life of the church.The breakaway group filed a lawsuit in 2013 seeking to control diocesan and parish properties, and a Dorchester County court found in their favor in 2015. The state Supreme Court overturned that decision in August 2017. It was the latter ruling that the group asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review.“We are grateful for the clarity that this decision offers, and hopeful that it brings all of us closer to having real conversations on how we can bring healing and reconciliation to the church, the body of Christ, in this part of South Carolina,” Episcopal Church in South Carolina Bishop Provisional Gladstone B. Adams III said in a statement after the denial.“Our path continues to be one of reconciliation and love, for love is the way of Jesus,” he said.The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision does not immediately change the physical control of the properties, according to diocesan Chancellor Thomas S. Tisdale Jr. The state court must enforce the ruling.However, the breakaway group, which calls itself the Diocese of South Carolina, has vowed to continue the legal fight. “The diocese remains confident that the law and the facts of this case favor our congregations,” the group said in response to the denied request. “We plan to continue to press both to their logical conclusion, even if that requires a second appearance before the South Carolina Supreme Court.”In the same statement, Lawrence expressed disappointment, but added, “Our hope remains steadfast in our heavenly father.“There are many unresolved legal questions which remain before the State Court as well as matters for prayerful discernment as we seek to carry out the mission to which we are called in Jesus Christ. We shall seek his guidance for both.”The Episcopal Church in South Carolina said in its statement that it and the Episcopal Church asked the state court May 8 to place diocesan property and assets under control of local Episcopalians, hand over ownership of property of the 28 affected parishes to the Episcopal Church and The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, and appoint a special master to oversee the transition.The Episcopal Church has been hoping to engage with leaders of the breakaway group since the state Supreme Court ruling in August, according to the statement. Adams and other diocesan leaders have been seeking direct contact with people in the affected parishes, offering a “Frequently Asked Questions” publication and arranging individual meetings to work with those who want to remain in their home churches as Episcopalians.The Episcopal Church in South Carolina’s Standing Committee, Diocesan Council, Trustees of the Diocese and deans will meet June 12 for prayer and to hear information and discuss plans for the months ahead.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is the Episcopal News Service’s senior editor and reporter. Rector Washington, DC June 11, 2018 at 1:44 pm Can’t imagine anything left to resolve on the property issue except who is responsible for replacing assets that the Court has ruled were being held in trust for the benefit OT the Episcopal Church and have been misappropriated by the trustees for some other purpose.(see definition for embezzlement) mike geibel says: Featured Jobs & Calls July 8, 2018 at 12:43 am Endorsing and performing same sex marriages is a position of neutrality? Bruce Garner says: June 12, 2018 at 12:34 pm The word repressing is a misprint.The correct word is representing.Quite a difference in meaning. Press Release Service June 12, 2018 at 9:20 am I wish those involved in these dispute would look to the example of Bishop Shannon Johnston in Virginia. Bp Shannon has shown far more charity to our schismatics than I can muster. 1. The Supreme Court NEVER hears these cases, for good reason. Secular courts in the US will never settle questions of church law. 2. General Convention is not some outside agency who interferes in local affairs. General Convention is US. It is the Episcopal Church. Our schismatic friends act like a bunch of petulant school kids. You knew what the rules were when you signed on. Now you want to change them. In church history things change, because we discern we been doing it wrong. Otherwise we would be praying to St Ambrose’s hip bone. 3 If you like our Prayer Book so much where were you in 1979 when you found it outrageous? Submit a Job Listing Matt Ouellette says: Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem S.R.Price says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA June 14, 2018 at 10:13 am In other words,Doug,you can’t find anything from Jesus condemning same sex relationships.I can’t either.His acknowledgement of the first relationship between Adam and Eve does not constitute a condemnation of things he was not even asked for an answer on.Again,you’ve got to do the “twist” and put words in Jesus’s mouth to get to that conclusion from this example.Meanwhile back to the theme of this thread,the real Bishop of South Carolina,Skip Adams,outlined a plan for integration of the breakaway parishes back into the Episcopal Church at a meeting of Diocesan and parish leaders Tuesday.He also reported that people including vestry members from the disassociated parishes had established contact with him.Things are starting to happen. Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL July 8, 2018 at 12:27 am To preach against behavior that would, if unchecked, keep someone out of heaven, is not excluding them from the family of God. And condoning such behavior is not love. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books June 11, 2018 at 7:22 pm There is a place for us. It’s called the Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter. Check out ordinariate.net. Biblical truth. Anglican roots. It’s who we really are and our only genuine hope in all this mess. Doug Desper says: Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York S.R.Price says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Stephan Clark says: Charles Towne says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Rector Bath, NC Rose Anne Grasty says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Comments (32) Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC June 11, 2018 at 6:06 pm The Episcopal Church in Maryland, Virginia,New York South Carolina and beyond is truly blessed to have had the Gospel laden prophecy and leadership of The Rt. Rev Skip Adams for over three and a half decades. Thank you Skip, my ministry and those that I have served are better because of your ministry. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Christopher Buser says: South Carolina June 11, 2018 at 9:32 pm The Presiding Bishop goes to celebrity weddings to talk about love while the rest of us wear our hatred on our sleeves. Maybe it is time we gave it a rest. Rector Hopkinsville, KY June 19, 2018 at 2:05 am Does seem to me that the problem with the American Church is ‘individualism’. While I understand that it is important for us to stand on our own two feet…we also belong to each other.The word ‘ catholic’ means more than anything else our togetherness…WE are the Body of Christ. I am not the body…I am the stupid toe that turns left instead of right…the Body helps me to belong …even though I may be malformed…I still belong…and don’t require that everyone conforms to my malformity Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI S.R.Price says: S.R.Price says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

Diocese establishes support centers after serious flooding in Japan

first_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Diocese establishes support centers after serious flooding in Japan An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Tags Anglican Communion, [Anglican Communion News Service] The Diocese of Kobe in the Nippon Sei Ko Kai – the Anglican Communion in Japan – has responded to significant flooding in the region by establishing support centers. Bishop Augustine Kobayashi called for the centers in response to the immense damage caused by heavy rain last month. Areas of western Japan were inundated with water as result of the extreme weather, and the diocese has been providing support to the victims of the tragedy.Read the full article here. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit an Event Listing Posted Aug 14, 2018 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Asia Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Episcopal Church’s parochial report numbers fuel discussion of decline and…

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Evangelism Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL By David PaulsenPosted Oct 5, 2018 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Church’s parochial report numbers fuel discussion of decline and rebirth Rector Smithfield, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Tags The congregation at Calvary Episcopal Church in the Shadyside neighborhood of Pittsburgh listens to Presiding Bishop Michael Curry during Eucharist on Feb 5, 2017. Diocese of Pittsburgh Bishop Dorsey McConnell, right, sat in the pews for the sermon. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] The 12 apostles, the 40 days of fasting, the five loaves and two fish. Some key numbers are peppered throughout the Gospels, but no one would mistake attending church on Sunday for a math lesson.And yet, for every Episcopal congregation, there is a count.Actually, several counts, including total number of active members, average pledge and the endlessly fluctuating “average Sunday attendance.” That data gets wrapped into the annual parochial reports that each congregation files with the Episcopal Church, and the cumulative data is released once a year as one benchmark for church vitality.For several years that benchmark has pointed to a denomination in decline, with church attendance and membership trending downward in all corners of the Episcopal Church. When the latest churchwide data summary was released in August, the response was a familiar mix of hand-wringing, naysaying and soul-searching about the future of the Episcopal Church.“Facing more Episcopal Church decline” was The Living Church’s blunt headline on an analysis of the latest numbers by the Rev. David Goodhew, director of ministerial practice at Durham University’s Cranmer Hall in Durham, England.“The church deserves congratulation for the detail, accuracy, and especially candor it shows in sharing its data,” Goodhew wrote. “Beyond that, it has to be said that the news is bad.”How bad? Over five years, the number of active baptized members in the church’s domestic dioceses has dropped 10 percent to 1.7 million. Sunday attendance is down 13 percent. There are 175 fewer parishes and missions reporting parochial data than in 2013. The 10-year trend is even more sobering, particularly in dioceses hit by sharp membership drops due to splits over doctrinal disagreements, including Forth Worth, Pittsburgh, San Joaquin and South Carolina. The one bright spot churchwide is that the average pledge has been increasing each year.Such data generates a fair amount of discussion within the church each year. On Aug. 30, Kevin Miller, an Episcopalian from Massachusetts, raised the issue in the Episcopal Evangelists group on Facebook.“What can we do to buck this trend? Lord help us!” Miller said while sharing The Living Church’s story.Responses ranged from the hopeful to the practical. Stop promoting “gimmicks” like Ashes to Go, some said. Others suggested looking beyond the walls of the church for evangelism opportunities rather than obsessing about filling the pews.The Rev. Chris Arnold, rector at Trinity Episcopal Church in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, issued a back-to-basics call. “The church will shrink until it rediscovers its primary purpose, which is to be a community of pilgrim disciples, supporting one another in the art and craft of prayer,” he said.The Episcopal Church, of course, is not the only mainline Protestant denomination suffering from decline. Only 36 percent of Americans identified as Protestant in an ABC News/Washington Post poll released in May, down from 50 percent in 2003. Overall, Christians declined from 83 percent to 72 percent of Americans over the same period, while those who claim no religion have doubled.Nor is decline in worship attendance an exclusively Episcopal concern. Weekly attendance at religious services of all faiths dropped from 39 percent in 2007 to 36 percent in 2014, according to the Pew Research Center’s Religious Landscape Study. In a separate Pew survey released in August, 37 percent of Americans who don’t attend religious services frequently said the reason was they practice their faith in other ways. An additional 23 percent said they simply haven’t found a place of worship that they like.Seen in this broader context, the Episcopal Church is not alone in facing the “challenge of understanding broad social changes” that are affecting American Christian churches, said the Rev. Michael Barlowe, executive officer of General Convention, whose staff collects the parochial report data.Declining membership and attendance numbers represent one snapshot of the Episcopal Church, and much can be learned from that data, Barlowe said in an interview with Episcopal News Service.“We shouldn’t be afraid of that,” he said. “It doesn’t mean we’re doing something wrong.”Barlowe also doesn’t think those numbers tell the full story of the church’s good work. The Episcopal Church, like other denominations, still emphasizes measurements and funding models established hundreds of years ago, when the Christian church was a more central institution in American society, he said. Today’s church is engaged in ministries that expand its spiritual footprint in ways the parochial reports may miss, such as food pantries or Bible studies in coffee shops.“We need to grow in every way,” he said.Church planting “is crock pot work, not microwave work,” the Rev. Michael Michie, staff officer for church planting infrastructure, said in July at the 79th General Convention in Austin, Texas. Photo: David Paulsen/Episcopal News ServiceAn important way to grow is by starting new congregations, argues the Rev. Michael Michie, the Episcopal Church’s staff officer for church planting infrastructure. The Episcopal Church has approved more than $8 million to start new congregations and regional ministries from 2013 through 2021. Michie works closely with recipients of those grants to ensure they get the backing they need.Even the 86 new ministries planted from 2012 to 2017 likely wasn’t aggressive enough, Michie said in a blog post about the parochial report data.“Just imagine how [the Episcopal Church] would change if we set this as a priority,” he wrote. “It would change the way we look for leaders, educate and train clergy, allocate resources and run dioceses. Decline makes us want to circle the wagons. I’m calling for the church to head ’em up and move ’em out! More than ever, we need pioneers, not settlers.”New churches also should be planted in the right places, reaching congregations where they live, and with entrepreneurial leaders, Michie wrote.He also threw out a target of more than 900 new church plants, based on a statistical analysis of what might be required to reverse the Episcopal Church’s decline. Michie, in an interview with Episcopal News Service, said he cited that figure “just to communicate the hill that is ahead of us to climb,” but he also thinks an aggressive approach to church planting would redefine how the Episcopal Church operates.“The way that would impact and change our church would be terrific. It would supercharge our existing churches,” he said. “If they’re doing this and innovating in this way, we can too.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, during his first three years leading the Episcopal Church, has been active in pushing for initiatives that will expand the church’s reach in new ways. He often talks of the church being part of the larger Jesus Movement and recently unveiled the Way of Love, a rule of life to help Episcopalians live into the calling of that movement.Curry also has led a series of large revivals that serve as the cornerstone of his emphasis on evangelism, seeking to reach new people outside the church with Jesus’ message of love. Racial reconciliation is another top priority of the church under Curry, as detailed in the Becoming Beloved Community framework that was launched last year.Presiding Bishop Michael Curry begins an impassioned sermon before a packed audience at a revival held on July 7 at Austin’s Palmer Center. Photo: Mike Patterson/Episcopal News ServiceDespite such activity at the churchwide level and the dozens of new church plants, many existing congregations still may not be meeting the spiritual needs of all their parishioners, particularly newer ones.“We are an old denomination, age-wise, so I think I have a feeling that would be part of what is behind the decline,” the Rev. Jay Sidebotham told Episcopal News Service.Sidebotham, who serves part time as associate rector at St. James’ Parish in Wilmington, North Carolina, has studied the dynamics at play in congregation vitality through his work leading RenewalWorks, a ministry of Forward Movement. RenewalWorks released a study in January that found more than half of Episcopal congregations can be classified as “restless,” meaning parishioners are hungry for spiritual growth but may not receive the support they are looking for from clergy or church leaders.They remain active, for now, but “don’t actually expect that much to happen in their own spiritual experience,” Sidebotham said.For the past five years, RenewalWorks has helped more than 200 Episcopal congregations focus more intently on the spiritual life of their parishioners. Curry’s talk of evangelism and discipleship has helped lead the way, Sidebotham said, and RenewalWorks’ report suggested four catalysts for supporting Episcopalians on their spiritual journeys:Engagement with scripture,The transforming power of the Eucharist,A deeper prayer life, andThe heart of the congregation’s leader.“A focus on discipleship is just critical,” Sidebotham said. “That’s job one and that’s what we’re all about.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LAlast_img read more