ALFALIT Delegation on Assessment Mission in Liberia

first_imgAlfalit International president Dr. Joseph Milton says his delegation is in Liberia to evaluate and assess the Adult Literacy programA 13-person Alfalit International delegation comprising adult literacy personnel is in the country on an assessment mission to its Liberia program. The guests from the Miami, Florida headquarters in the United States are visiting Alfalit International Liberia to strengthen the educational, managerial and administrative capacities of the Liberian staffs.At a press conference on Tuesday, October 2 in Monrovia, Alfalit International president Dr. Joseph Milton, described the Alfalit-Liberia adult literacy and skills training as one initiative that has had some impacts on the lives of adult literacy learners.The current Alfalit International mission to Liberia, Dr. Milton said, will have some encounters with multinational corporations in-country to foster partnerships for the growth of the nation’s educational sector. He added that the group is expected to identify gaps and assess the impact and effectiveness of the new literacy materials being used at the various literacy programs in the country.Dr. Milton said the team will also evaluate and assess the Liberia Ghana Mission’s (LGM) scholarship program and conduct refresher training in the identified gaps.He, however, said that the previous Alfalit International Mission to Liberia has observed some managerial and administrative gaps that needed some professional capacity building for the development of its operations.Alfalit Liberia executive director, Rev. Emmanuel Giddings and Alfalit International president, Dr. Joseph MiltonDr. Milton said that the Alfalit Liberia Adult Literacy program has the largest operations in all 15 countries in its enrollment and impact. He said the Liberia programs have created some good results that should claim the attention of educational stakeholders and their support partners.He expressed the hope that while the team is in the country, it would engage in private and corporate companies and expand relationships with communities where its literacy program is being held as well as schools where LGM supports students every academic year.Dr. Milton expressed hope that the private sector and corporate entities could see the collective collaboration as some of the ways to give back to the communities where those investments are carrying out their operations in Liberia.He said such an initiative could be possible but he was quick to note that the team would like to first assess the current program as it reaches some appreciable levels.While Liberia has over the years become the prime target of the Alfalit International Literacy Program, Dr. Milton revealed that Liberia was the first country he visited in Africa and that Liberians have demonstrated the determination and made great strides in efforts to generate the highest enrollment of literacy learners.Dr. Milton disclosed that in 2019, Alfalit International will be looking at different opportunities after the evaluation and planning processes currently underway by a team of Alfalit Young Professional Board and three crew members who made up the delegation.He said in the 2019 proposed program, the organization will embark on a preschool program and job skills initiative that would strengthen the overall educational development.Dr. Milton explained that Liberia is the only country that he continues to visit every year and his professional interpersonal relationship with the executive director of Alfalit International Liberia, Reverend Emmanuel J. Giddings, has set the pace for the kind of support Liberia continues to receive.“Admittedly, however, Liberia has a special place in my heart and coming to Liberia every year is not my choice but, the love God has placed in my heart for Liberia and Liberians and I believe God wants to be here and the brilliant work being done in one of the poorest countries in the world,” Dr. Milton said.Dr. Milton said the Alfalit International Liberia Program has demonstrated a sound learning pace as students are able to learn faster and continue to meet up with the quality standards set by the entity’s overseas staff over the past twelve years.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

22nd Annual Mile Zero Cruisers begins today in Dawson Creek

first_imgDAWSON CREEK, B.C. – Classic cars, hot rods, and other unique vehicles will be arriving in Dawson Creek today for the 22nd Annual Mile Zero Cruisers Summer Cruise.The event takes place over three days, as hundreds of participants from across the Peace Region show off their pride and joys. Cars will be arriving at the Dawson Co-Op this evening from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. to register, as well as provide a sneak peek at some of the cars that will be on display all weekend.Saturday, events begin in earnest with the Mini Show’n’Shine at Brown’s Chevrolet at 9:00a.m., before the Cruisers Poker Run kicks off from Pioneer Village at 11:00.- Advertisement -One of Northern BC’s largest displays of internal combustion made beautiful begins on Sunday morning at 8:30 a.m. This year’s show’n’shine will see cars parked across nine city blocks of downtown Dawson Creek, before prizes are handed out at the Mile ‘0’ marker at 2:30 p.m.Admission for those bringing their vehicle to the show’n’shine is $25.00, or $60.00 for all the of the weekend’s events. Admission to the show’n’shine for the public is free.last_img read more

Mikel’s father kidnapped before Nigeria’s defeat by Argentina

first_imgMikel, who went on to play the full 90 minutes of the 2-1 defeat, refused to tell anyone at the Nigerian Football Federation in fear his father’s life was at risk, and partly because he did not want to be a distraction before the game“I played while my father was in the hands of bandits,” Mikel told The Guardian. “I had to suppress the trauma. I took a call four hours before kick-off to tell me what had happened.“I was emotionally distraught and I had to make the decision about whether I was mentally ready to play. I was confused. I did not know what to do but, in the end, I knew that I could not let 180m Nigerians down.“I had to shut it out of my head and go and represent my country first. I could not even inform the coaches or NFF staff and only a very tight circle of my friends knew.“I was told that they would shoot my dad instantly if I reported to the authorities or told anybody. I also did not want to discuss it with the coach [Gernot Rohr] because I did not want my issue to become a distraction to him or the rest of the team on the day of such an important game. As much as I wanted to discuss it with the coach, I could not.”Mikel’s father, Pa Michael Obi, had previously been abducted back in 2011 when he was held captive for 10 days.On this occasion, he was kidnapped in south-east Nigeria as he travelled to a funeral. The police in Nigeria were able to secure his release but Mikel said his father was tortured during a week-long ordeal.“Thankfully, my father was safely released on Monday afternoon,” he added. “I thank the police authorities for their rescue efforts and the support I’ve received from friends and family members.“Unfortunately, my dad is now in hospital receiving emergency treatment as a result of the torture he received during his capture.”0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Captain John Obi Mikel captained Nigeria at the 2018 Russia FIFA World CupLONDON, United Kingdom July 4 – John Obi Mikel has revealed that he learned his father had been kidnapped just hours before he played in Nigeria’s loss to Argentina which saw his country knocked out of the World Cup last week.The Nigeria captain was informed of the news by a family member while he travelled on the team bus to the stadium in St. Petersburg. Mikel was told that he must call the kidnappers and when he did so, he was ordered to pay a ransom.last_img read more

NEW TOUCH FOOTBALL AUSTRALIA DIRECTOR ELECTED

first_imgTouch Football Australia (TFA) have great pleasure in announcing current Australian Capital Territory (ACT) Touch Association President Michael Rush as a new Director on the TFA Board of Management (BOM). Michael Rush joins returning member Brian Rooney as a Director after the TFA Annual General Meeting (AGM) was held at Bankstown Sports club in Sydney on Saturday 21 October 2006. Both gentlemen were elected to the TFA BOM via a ballot undertaken at the AGM by delegates representing each State.The five-member TFA BOM now consists of Chairman Michael Sparks, and fellow directors Bill Ker, Bruce Ainsley, Brian Rooney, and of course “new boy” Michael Rush.Michael has had a 15-year association with Touch Football, and boasts experience across many of the sport’s arms, including refereeing and referee coaching, playing, and administration.Michael has tertiary qualifications in economics and works in programme management in the Public Service.His experience in strategic analysis and planning, financial management and working with community entities will be invaluable assets to the TFA Board of Management, as the sport enters a new and exciting phase of growth, expansion, and professionalism.Michael brings a perfect balance to the Board of Management position, combining an impressive skill set in business with a very “hands-on” appreciation, knowledge, and experience of the sport of Touch Football and our affiliated members.In addition to being the ACT Touch Association President since 2003, Michael was the Vice-President of the organisation in 2001-02, and has been an ACT Touch Association Board Member since 1998.Michael has been a member of the National Referees Panel since 2005, is the current ACT Director of Referees and a past president as well as long-serving Committee Member of the ACT Touch Referees Association.Michael is a Level 4 Course Presenter and a Level 3 Referee Coach.Michael is excited about his new role and about having an opportunity to contribute in this way to the future opportunities for the sport and we welcome him on board.last_img read more

15 days agoWijnaldum full of praise for Adrian over Liverpool impact

first_imgWijnaldum full of praise for Adrian over Liverpool impactby Paul Vegas15 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveGini Wijnaldum was full of praise when asked about Liverpool teammate Adrian.The Spanish goalkeeper enjoyed an unforgettable debut for the Reds this season, helping them win on penalties in the UEFA Super Cup final over Chelsea.An injury to Alisson on opening day has seen the 30-year-old help Liverpool maintain eight straight wins, with his contribution not going unrecognised by his teammates.”Since the first day he settled quite well,” Wijnaldum told the club’s website. “He speaks with everyone and he’s a good person, everyone talks with him.”You could see that he was not shy. Normally when players come in they always look, ‘Who can I talk to?’ and everything, but he talks with everyone. Before the game, he says what he wants to say.”Basically since the day he came in he was already one of us.”He added: “He’s done a really good job. If you see the kind of saves he makes, really important saves during the games.”He also has a big influence on the results we had.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

8 days agoAston Villa boss Smith ‘extremely proud’ of Mings

first_imgAston Villa boss Smith ‘extremely proud’ of Mingsby Paul Vegas8 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveAston Villa boss Dean Smith was delighted for Tyrone Mings over his England debut.The defender was impressive in Bulgaria, dominated by the racist chanting of home fans.Smith said, “Talking about his football first, extremely proud to see one of my players make his debut for England, assured performance, the biggest accolade I could give him was that it looked like he was playing for Aston Villa. “He was organising people around him, was calm on the ball, the sort of performance we see regularly. “Didn’t get tested defensively but played his part in a good result for England.”He continued, “He’s come back here and trained, got on with things as normal and not really said too much about it. I can only sing his praises. “When we go and look at players and speak to them we know what they’re going to bring football-wise, but it’s that personality, character that you’re looking to find out about. “Me and JT went to meet him and he impressed us. Having met him, brought him here on loan and signed him – we’ve seen him every day and it doesn’t surprise me how he handled the whole situation. “He’s articulate, intelligent and a very good human being as well.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Pan Americas Handed Over to Its Owners

first_imgThe liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier Pan Americas, the second one constructed for the Queensland Curtis LNG Project, was handed over to its owners.Jointly owned by Teekay LNG Partners, China LNG Shipping International, and China’s CNOOC Limited, the 174,000 cbm vessel was constructed by China’s shipbuilder Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding.Following delivery, Pan Americas commenced a long-term charter contract with oil major Shell.Featuring 98,500 dwt and a length of 290 meters, the carrier was named and completed at the shipyard on January 12.The vessel is part of a batch of four LNG carriers ordered for the Queensland Curtis LNG Project in 2014.According to data provided by VesselsValue, Pan Americas has a market value of around USD 180 million.World Maritime News Staff, Image Courtesy: Teekay Corporation/Colin Bealllast_img read more

Skeptical Football Goatslingers Manning vs Messi And The Andrew Luck Experiment

In last week’s column, I pointed out the importance of teams’ early records when trying to predict their playoff fates. This prompted a few skeptical tweets, like so:This tweeter is obviously right. The first few games of the season are predictive in part because losing games makes it harder to make the playoffs, and in part because they tell us something about the strength of the teams that lost them.That said, “Correlation is not causation” is what I like to call The Hammer to end arguments against all kinds of statistical findings. People use it to bash anything, but it’s blunt and dangerous.1Every time someone uses The Hammer on me, a puppy loses its wings.The artist and writer Randall Munroe took on The Hammer in xkcd:In the alt text of that comic, he hits the nail on the head: “Correlation doesn’t imply causation, but it does waggle its eyebrows suggestively and gesture furtively while mouthing ‘look over there.’”Let’s break down an example2Rookie Quarterback Watch has pretty much devolved into “How Bad Will the QBs Ahead of Rookie QBs Get Before the Rookie QBs Get to Start?” Watch.: Last week I observed that quarterbacks who (A) start more games in their rookie seasons (B) tend to have better careers. What does this observation imply?There are several possibilities:Starting rookies causes them to have better careers (A causes B).The types of rookies who are likely to have better careers are more likely to earn a rookie starting spot (B causes A).Rookies who are drafted higher are more likely to get starts, and are also more likely to have better careers (something else — call it C — causes both A and B).This is all just a coincidence and we should go home.Some combination of the above.That covers a lot of bases, but by making the observation, Nos. 1 through 3 become more likely than they were before. In this case, it’s fairly easy to establish that the relationship between A and B (rookie starts and non-rookie career AV) exists even when controlling for C (draft position).Following the observation that A and B are correlated, basically any possible state of the universe in which A and B are causally related has become more likely. For a Bayesian, determining which possibilities have seen their likelihood change the most involves consulting his prior beliefs, establishing which possibilities were the most likely before his new observation, and how likely the observation would be if each possibility were true. This leads to an updated set of beliefs about the likelihood of each scenario, which becomes the baseline for evaluating new observations, and so on.Charitably, “correlation ≠ causation” itself is a kind of limited Bayesian analysis. When people use it, they often mean simply that the “A causes B” scenario still doesn’t seem very likely to them, and thus they think other explanations are more likely. This is the case for most popular statistics examples, like the fact that lemon imports correlate negatively with highway fatality. That lemons are somehow preventing accidents is obviously ridiculous, so it doesn’t matter how strong the correlation is: It’s either a coincidence or we’re going to need other explanations.3I should note that for a true Bayesian, the odds that lemon imports actually do reduce highway fatality has still increased on the margins.But the idea that rookies playing could help them develop is not ridiculous — it’s highly debatable. After observing the relationship between rookie QB starts and career success (plus controlling for draft position), I must conclude that playing rookies is more likely to be good for their careers than I thought before, barring any other evidence. But that doesn’t mean it’s true. The alternative (or concurrent) explanation is also plausible: If coaches are good at determining which rookie QBs are actually good, and then tend to start the better ones, it’s still possible that starting them has a neutral (or even negative) effect on their careers individually. Regardless of which explanation is true, the observation remains the same: a rookie QB getting the start is good news for his prospects.Charts of the weekAaron Rodgers had his ups and downs against the Jets last week:I jest, of course. Rodgers brilliantly brought the Packers back from a 21-3 hole, but the comeback was complete by the end of the third quarter.This was Rodgers’s first-ever win after being down 15 points or more4I picked this number because it’s the smallest margin which Rodgers has never overcome, but as a separate and interesting point, I’ve found that 15-16 point margins, while technically “two scores” because they can be reached with two touchdowns plus two point conversions, actually act more like three score margins (17) than two score margins (14). against an opponent — though it was only his 12th opportunity. Here’s how he stacks up against other QBs since 2001 in comparable situations:Whoa, Peyton Manning! Forget Rodgers, Manning is the story here. But, it’s only 10 wins. Crazy things happen right? Let’s widen the scope, taking a look at all games in which a player’s team trailed by eight or more points, rather than just 15 or more:Peyton Manning is a practically Messi-esque outlier, complete with his own Cristiano Ronaldo to keep him company.Goatslinger of the weekThis was a tough week for gunslingers, as QBs who threw interceptions went 1-14, most of those games weren’t that close, and many of the interceptions were terrible. (Our nominal winner: Matt Ryan, whose three interceptions were at least all thrown downfield while his team was trailing.)So I’ve invented a new (hopefully temporary) award of ignominy: the Goatslinger.Andrew Luck, last week’s Gunslinger, is a contender for Goatslinger this week. With just 5:15 left, up seven against the Philadelphia Eagles, and already in field goal range, he threw an interception to Malcolm Jenkins. Plays like that give gamblers a bad name!But the top Goatslinger was Colin Kaepernick for his amazing effort to throw away San Francisco’s win against Chicago. He managed four turnovers (three interceptions and a fumble), three of them with his team up, including the interception up 20-14 in the fourth quarter that led to Chicago’s game-deciding touchdown.Twitter question of the week, Part 1I had two interesting questions on Twitter this week related to the timing and length of drives. First up:The answer is essentially “none,” or that there ends up being even less scoring in these scenarios. But the question is deceptively interesting. It’s also a fun vehicle for exploring the relationship between turnover rates and scoring/touchdown rates.In general, teams score more per drive when they are behind, but are also more likely to turn the ball over. I’ve broken down drives by quarter and point margin (tied, up or down 1-3 points, 4-7 points, 8-14 points, and 15 points or more) and compared how often the drives resulted in touchdowns to how often they resulted in turnovers.5To pre-empt a question I will almost certainly get despite this attempt to pre-empt it: Yes, obviously a lot more can happen on drives than just touchdowns or turnovers. For example, drives that end in field goal attempts count as neither, even though they may lead to points. This matters in situations where there’s no time for a touchdown, or where a team only cares about the three points. But we’ve excluded a lot of those situations by filtering out the last two minutes of each half. It’s also possible to do the same analysis on a points-per-drive, or even “expected points added” basis, but the results are similar. Considering the implications are the same, I prefer the symmetry and ease of interpreting touchdowns vs. turnovers. This gives us a sense of the trade-off between the two.Think of a drive when the game is tied in the first quarter as a kind of baseline: If a team starts at least 70 yards out, 15.5 percent of such drives will end in TDs, and 12.5 percent will end in turnovers. Compare that to the situation where teams are most aggressive: when they’re down 8-14 points in the fourth quarter. In those scenarios they score touchdowns 21.2 percent of the time and turn it over at a 27.5 percent clip.As teams play more aggressively, their chances of scoring go up, but so do their chances of turning the ball over. You can think of the ratio between these chances as the “price” of marginal scoring. For example, increasing your chances of scoring a touchdown by 1 percent requires increasing your chances of turning the ball over by up to 2 percent.6I should note that this exchange rate is likely skewed a little by the fact that worse teams tend to be behind more. I’m working on deskewing this to get a more exact comparison for a future project. In some situations, that’s a price you’re willing to pay (such as when you’re behind and stalled drives are pretty much just as bad), and in some it’s not.Understanding this trade-off is useful in analyzing a whole range of things in football, and my study of it is ongoing. But in the meantime, we can use our immediate findings to look at the situations our tweeter asked about and see what’s going on there.Before the half, it’s apparent that teams are extremely willing to settle for the points they have. With between one and two minutes on the clock in the second quarter, teams score touchdowns on 7 percent of their drives and turn the ball over on 12.9 percent. These are both lower than our baseline, so they’re definitely being conservative. It’s unclear what effect more aggression would have.With between one and two minutes on the clock at the end of the fourth quarter in games separated by between four and eight points, teams score touchdowns on 15.3 percent of drives, and turn the ball over on 42.1 percent of them. This is interesting because they spend a large number of turnovers on a completely average number of touchdowns. I think this reflects time pressure, but it could also suggest that true last-ditch “prevent” defenses may be pretty effective.Twitter question of the week, Part 2The simple answer is: Absolutely, a drive that eats up clock is valuable — when a team is ahead and wants to shorten the game. But shortening the game can also be useful when one team is a lot worse than the other.Imagine trading 100 drives with a team led by Peyton Manning, the Chiefs’ opponent in Week 2. Manning scores more per drive than anyone, and his accumulated points scored over 100 of them would be impossible for all but the best teams to overcome. Say the difference between your team and Manning’s was that Manning’s was one point per drive better — in a 100-drive game, your team would have to run 100 points above expectation to have a fighting chance. Statistically, that’s virtually impossible.7A team’s standard deviation on points scored over 100 drives is only 10 times the standard deviation of points scored for a single drive, so it can’t be more than 35, which would make a 100-point swing a three-standard-deviation event.But if each team got only one drive, yours would win every time it scored and Manning’s didn’t. That’s orders of magnitude more likely.This was pretty much exactly what happened with the Chiefs against the Broncos. The Chiefs had two extremely long drives in the second half: The first came at the start of the third quarter, lasted 10 minutes, and ended with a missed 37-yard field goal. The second came at the start of the fourth quarter, lasted 7:42, and ended with a Chiefs TD that drew them within four and set up a potential game-winning drive after Manning failed to score. As a result, Manning had only two meaningful possessions in the entire second half. Down 11 points, the Chiefs needed to score twice in their three possessions and have Denver score none in their two to win. Given the circumstances, those aren’t terrible odds.But let’s focus on their second drive at the very beginning of the fourth. It’s extremely risky to draw up a drive that lasts that long when down 11, as the end of the game quickly approaches. But leaving that aside, they did score a TD in a supposedly back-breaking fashion. Are such TDs any more valuable than regular TDs in similar situations?Using play-by-play data from ESPN, I looked back at all touchdown-scoring drives starting in the third quarter8I excluded the fourth quarter to minimize end-of-game effect. since 2001 in which a team was down 11-13 points at the start. I was kind of surprised by the results:The sample sizes on these aren’t very big (it’s only 107 cases total, and the most likely drive is right around the middle), but teams have won nine of 19 cases (47 percent) in which their scoring drives lasted longer than three minutes. That’s a pretty big number for being down, and it’s way higher than the 20 percent teams won after scoring on more normal drives. Why and if that’s significant, I don’t know, but it certainly leaves open the possibility that long drives like that may indicate/affect something larger.The Hacker Gods read FiveThirtyEightAs we all know, the Hacker Gods — who probably created this universe, by accident, while simulating a fourth-dimensional supernova — obviously read FiveThirtyEight. Last week they appeared to enjoy bolstering my analysis of Philip Rivers, but this week they are trying to undo me.Aaron Rodgers, whom I previously criticized for playing too conservatively (especially when behind), somehow brought the Packers back from 18 down against the Jets, earning the first 15+ point comeback victory of his career.Last week I talked up the majesty of gambling even if it risks an interception, but in Week 2 quarterbacks who threw one or more interceptions went 1-14.The only INT-throwing QB to win was Nick Foles against the Colts, but he won in part because inaugural Gunslinger of the Week Andrew Luck basically gave the game away by throwing his own INT with his team up seven and in field goal range in the fourth (suffice to say, that is a terrible spot to gamble).Experimental chart of the weekInspired by the Aaron Rodgers comeback, I asked on Twitter who people would want leading their team if it was down 15 or more points. Andrew Luck won the straw poll by a landslide with 47 percent of the votes, versus 20 percent for Peyton Manning. (Turnout was poor.9Only 15 votes total.)From the Charts of the Week above, this might seem pretty silly. For the most part, it is: Manning has won a higher percentage of games in which he has been down by 15 points than Luck, over a lot more games, even though it seems Luck has been on a tear for a couple of years. Impressive, but Manning has been down 15 much less often than Luck.This chart plots the percentage of 15-point comeback opportunities won vs. how often those opportunities have come up. I’ve also represented the total number of games, the number of comeback opportunities, and the number of successful comebacks as concentric circles, and plotted like so:Manning is even more impressive relative to Brady/Rodgers, but Luck managing to win in 3 of just 13 tries despite being on a team that ends up in that spot 36 percent of the time isn’t too shabby (the other data point near Luck at 20 percent is Matthew Stafford). If he can keep that up for another decade or so, he might just be a worthy successor to Manning.Most empirically significant game of Week 3If I could only watch one game, obviously it would be the Broncos/Seahawks Super Bowl rematch. But there is probably nothing that could happen in that game that would surprise me.Minnesota at New Orleans, on the other hand, holds some mystery. It may have even more empirical effect on Peyton Manning’s legacy than Manning’s own game: Every game that Matt Cassel bombs is more evidence that Bill Belichick has more to do with Tom Brady’s success than Tom Brady (because then it’s more likely that Cassel’s/Brady’s success in New England was because of Belichick), that Randy Moss is likely responsible for much of Brady’s (and Cassel’s) statistical accomplishment, and thus that Peyton Manning is the greatest quarterback of this generation.Charts by Reuben Fischer-BaumCORRECTION (Sept. 18, 1:50 p.m.): This article originally misstated the time and recipient of Andrew Luck’s interception in the Colts’ game against the Eagles. Luck threw the interception with 5:15, not 5:32, left in the fourth quarter and Malcolm Jenkins, not Rahim Moore, intercepted it. read more

OSU football recruits Towering receiver flying under the radar

When discussing college recruiting, experts often say, “the sky’s the limit” about a specific recruit’s potential. Ohio State recruit Tyrone Williams might have already reached the sky. The towering 6-foot-7-inch, 215-pound wide receiver from East Cleveland, Ohio, brings a height element to the OSU receiving core that Buckeye fans don’t see often. “He is unlike any other receiver prospect that has come into the program during the Jim Tressel era,” said Kevin Noon, managing editor of Buckeyegrove.com. Williams had 39 catches for 685 yards and 14 touchdowns as a senior and was second team All-State for Shaw High School. He was the No. 34 ranked wideout in the class of 2010 according to ESPN 150. He was also a letterman in basketball and track.  Steve Helwagen of Bucknuts.com said Williams has a lot of potential at the college level because of his size and build.  “There aren’t a lot of Randy Moss-type players. That is going to be able to create some mismatches for Ohio State in the red zone where they can throw him a jump ball,” Helwagen said. “We saw that in the Fiesta Bowl two years ago where Todd Boeckman threw the ball to Terrelle Pryor, and Texas had no defense for it.” Williams, who was also recruited by West Virginia, Cincinnati and Illinois, might have had other suitors if not for a knee injury that cut his junior season short.  “The injury his junior year left a little bit of skepticism out there,” Helwagen said. “I think some schools wanted to see what he did at the start of his senior year, but when Ohio State offered, it was an open and shut deal.” Noon thinks that Williams can probably benefit from redshirting this upcoming season. “He can learn the system, get into a collegiate strength and conditioning program, and work a little bit on honing his skills,” Noon said.  Helwagen said that if Williams doesn’t redshirt, he could make an impact due to his height advantage.  “He’s a weapon that Ohio State doesn’t have currently,” Helwagen said. “If he shows them that he can make plays right away in the fall, he’ll bring that element where he’ll be able to out jump corners because of his height.” Outside of the obvious height advantage, Williams brings great body control, a huge wingspan and a power forward’s frame to the Buckeyes.  “He is deceptively fast and has the ability to go get the ball,” Noon said. “He is able to give quarterbacks a huge target.” Ohio State clearly has a recruit in Williams, who has the potential to be a great receiver for the Buckeyes if he is able to shake off the effects of his injury and grow into the position. Noon said, “If he is able to live up to the billing, Ohio State got an absolute steal in Tyrone Williams.” read more

Urban Meyer likely next coach at Ohio State

Former Florida coach and current ESPN analyst Urban Meyer has agreed in principle to become Ohio State’s next head football coach, according to a report from WKMG-TV in Orlando. An OSU spokesman on Wednesday did not deny that Meyer will be the Buckeyes next coach. According to the WKMG-TV report, the deal is worth $40 million over seven years, which would make Meyer the highest paid coach in OSU history. “We have not been commenting on rumors and speculation,” university spokesman Jim Lynch said in an email to The Lantern. Meyer released a statement through ESPN denying a deal is in place. “I have not been offered any job nor is there a deal in place,” Meyer said in the statement. “I plan on spending Thanksgiving with my family and will not comment on this any further.” If the report is true, Meyer will be replacing interim coach Luke Fickell, who has led the Buckeyes to an 6-5 regular season record. Meyer began his coaching career at OSU when he accepted a graduate-assistant position for the Buckeyes in 1986 as the tight end coach. He became a wide receiver coach the following year. For the next 13 years, Meyer served as an assistant coach, which included stints at Illinois State, Colorado State and Notre Dame. In 2001, Meyer accepted his first head coaching position at Bowling Green where he led the Falcons to a 17-6 record in his two years there. He left to accept another head coaching job at the University of Utah in 2003. Meyer led the Utes to a 10-2 record and was named Coach of the Year in the Mountain West Conference. The following season, Meyer coached Utah to an undefeated season and beat Pittsburgh in the Fiesta Bowl, 35-7. It was the first time since the creation of the BCS that a school from a non-automatically qualifying BCS conference was able to run the table and finish the year without a loss. After the 2004 season, both Florida and Notre Dame pursued Meyer to become their next head coach. Meyer chose Florida and signed a $14 million contract. Meyer went 9-3 during his first year as the Gators coach, including a 31-24 victory of Iowa in the Outback Bowl. During his second year as Florida coach, Meyer led the Gators to a National Championship and 13-1 record by defeating the OSU 41-14 in the BCS Championship Game. Two years later, Florida won another National Championship after defeating the University of Oklahoma in the BCS Championship Game, 24-14. On Dec. 26, 2009, Meyer announced he would be resigning as coach of Florida following the team’s scheduled appearance in the BCS Sugar Bowl due to chest pains and severe headaches. The following day, Meyer announced an indefinite leave of absence instead of resigning. On Jan. 1, 2010, Meyer coached the Gators to a 51–24 Sugar Bowl victory against Cincinnati. After the win, Meyer took time off, but returned to his role as Gators head coach in time for the start of spring practice. Florida went 7-5 during the 2010 regular season, but on Dec. 8 Meyer announced his retirement from coaching. In his final game as Gator head coach, Florida beat Penn State in The Outback Bowl, 37-24. In 2011, Meyer accepted a position at ESPN working as a college football analyst. read more