GOV REAPING REWARD OF BOTCHED TEACHER ENGAGEMENT ON JUNIOR CERT REFORM – McCONALOGUE

first_imgCharlie McConalogue TD has said the Minister for Education should not proceed unilaterally with Junior Cert changes while teachers want more negotiations.Charlie McConalogue TDThe Fianna Fáil Spokesperson on Education and Skills said the Government has only itself to blame for the current state of relations with teacher representatives regarding reform of the Junior Cert.Deputy McConalogue commented: “It is no wonder relations between the Department of Education and teacher unions are at an all-time low when you consider the manner in which this government approached the issue of junior cert reform from the outset. “The Minister’s comments today that she intends to proceed with planned Junior Cert reforms without agreement will only serve to worsen relations with teachers. In fact such action would be extremely provocative given the fact that teachers have said they will not proceed with further strike action but do want more negotiations. I do not want to return to a situation where students could face more disruption in the run-up to exams.”He added the reality is the Government botched this reform process from the outset and alienated teachers in process.“You simply cannot engage in a reform of this magnitude without bringing key stakeholders with you. The genuine concerns that teachers were raising simply were not take into account until they had engaged in industrial action.“The Government needs to restore a spirit of partnership to the process of Junior Cert reform and just acting unilaterally will do nothing to bring that about.”  GOV REAPING REWARD OF BOTCHED TEACHER ENGAGEMENT ON JUNIOR CERT REFORM – McCONALOGUE was last modified: March 1st, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Charlie McConaloguedonegalGovernmentJunior Certlast_img read more

JSE unveils listing, BEE plans

first_img16 March 2006The JSE Limited, ranked seventh in the World Federation of Exchange’s top 10 performing markets last year, has unveiled plans to list on its own exchange in June, and to increase the level of black shareholding in Africa’s biggest bourse through an innovative two-part empowerment initiative.Making the announcement in Johannesburg on Wednesday, the JSE said the listing would boost its liquidity, open additional avenues for raising capital, and “place the JSE on the same footing as the leading international exchanges whose shares are now listed, thereby facilitating comparison between the JSE and these exchanges.”A number of exchanges around the world, including the biggest, the New York Stock Exchange, have listed recently, with strong investor response.JSE CEO Russell Loubser told Business Day that the listing would boost the exchange’s profile and attractiveness to investors.Piet Viljoen, chief investment officer of Regarding Capital Management, told Business Day: “We think [the JSE] is a fantastic company. It’s basically one of the best businesses you can invest in, with it being a monopoly.”2005 was a record-beating year for South Africa’s only stock exchange, with foreigners buying a record net R50-billion worth of local shares, the All Share index rocketing 43% – reaching countless record highs in the process – and the JSE’s market capitalisation increasing by 40% over 2004.According to Business Day, the JSE recorded a 53% increase in profit to R106-million for the year to December, and the exchange ranked seventh in the World Federation of Exchange’s top 10 performing markets for 2005.Increasing black shareholdingThe JSE said it would use the listing as a platform to establish a JSE empowerment fund – using 2% of the JSE’s issued share capital to fund the education of young black South Africans in the financial services field – as well as a black shareholder retention scheme.The initiative will serve to increase the JSE’s proportion of black shareholding from the current 9%, bringing it in line with financial sector’s black economic empowerment (BEE) charter, which prescribes a minimum 10% BEE shareholding.The black shareholder retention scheme aims to encourage black South Africans to buy and retain shares in the JSE until June 2011, by offering black shareholders the option of buying a set number of shares at 20% of the prevailing share price.The share options, exercisable in June 2011, will be offered in three tranches, in June 2006, 2007 and 2008.The JSE cautioned that while its listing was not conditional on shareholder approval of its BEE initiative, it would “reconsider the appropriateness of the listing if these initiatives are not approved by shareholders”.Boosting visibility, liquidityThe JSE has operated as a marketplace for trading in financial products for nearly 120 years.In this time, it has evolved from a traditional floor-based equities trading market to a modern securities exchange providing fully electronic trading, clearing and settlement in equities, financial and agricultural derivatives and other associated instruments with extensive surveillance capabilities.Since its demutualisation in July 2005, the JSE has been operating as an unlisted public company, with trading in JSE shares – which represented an ownership stake in the former mutual entity – limited to over-the-counter trades.Prior to Wednesday’s announcement, the JSE’s shares were trading in the over-the-counter market at between R140 and R160 each, valuing the group at between R1.17-billion and R1.33-billion.Following Wednesday’s announcement, according to Business Day, the JSE’s share price leapt to R187 per share – 17% up on Tuesday’s close, and more than 600% up on July 2005, when the JSE’s stock started out at R30 apiece.Listing, the JSE said, was “the next logical step” in its corporate evolution.Demutualisation has saddled the JSE with all the obligations of a listed company while giving its shareholders “none of the benefits of a truly transparent and easily accessible market in which to trade JSE shares.”Going public, the JSE said, would provide an appropriate platform for trading in JSE shares that would “improve the visibility and potentially liquidity in JSE shares and hence ensure that a clear and transparent price is achieved for buyers and sellers”.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

BECK REACHES FOR THE STARS

first_imgNicole Beck was an obvious choice as captain of the NSWCHS women’s team. A couple of months ago Beck got the call up to the National Women’s Open Squad and watching her play here at this tournament, it is not hard to see why. Getting the call up was something which she had dreamed of, and was not expecting it at all. Beck thought she hadn’t made the squad after missing out the initial on selection. “I was heaps shocked, but heaps happy too,” said Beck.Her talent shines here at this tournament, with skills that others are only just aiming to accomplish. But she believes that it is her commitment and determination in wanting to win that is her best attribute. “It’s my competitiveness, I hate to lose,” Beck said.Although Beck is not currently a part of the Australian Team to compete in the World Cup in South Africa next year, she is aiming to be a part of the following World Cup and will continue to strive for that goal. “I am just looking to keep learning and improving and hopefully in the future make the team,” Beck said. Beck’s message for the 750 athletes competing here this week who are looking to further their Touch career, is “keep going, set your goals high and keep your head up.”“I live by the motto: shoot for the moon because even if you miss at least you’ll land among the stars.”Influencing Beck’s Touch style is playing with and learning from players like Rachel Holden, and coaches like Tracey Bills. “I have been coached by Tracey Bills for about seven years and I have learnt a lot from her, actually almost everything,” Beck said.Beck’s NSWCHS team is now into the grand final against QSST and is hoping to repeat last year’s efforts, taking the title of under 18’s National Champions.last_img read more

2012 Trans Tasman Survey

first_imgTFA is committed to providing you with the most enjoyable experience at its events. Your responses to the questions within this survey will greatly assist us in this regard. Please click on the link below to complete the survey:http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/2012TransTasmanlast_img

a month agoMan Utd legend Neville: Contract will help De Gea settle

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Man Utd legend Neville: Contract will help De Gea settleby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United legend Gary Neville says a new contract could see David De Gea return to form.The Spaniard hasn’t been himself this season, but Neville says a new deal until 2023 could settle the 28-year-old.Neville told Sky Sports: “De Gea has had a difficult time in the Premier League and he’s had difficulties at home where he’s lost his place in the national team. I don’t think he’s fully recovered from the poor World Cup in 2018, and he’s made more mistakes in the last 15 months than ever before.”But I’ve got to believe that this is good news and hope that what’s happened in the last 12 to 15 months has been a result of the ongoing speculation. The hope is that now he’s signed, he can settle down and start performing.”United need a spine. They had eight academy players in the squad on Saturday, but their problem isn’t the academy. The problem is that they haven’t got a strong, dominant spine, but De Gea can be the start of that.” last_img read more

17 days agoArsenal stopper Mustafi reveals he played injured in Liverpool thrashing

first_imgArsenal stopper Mustafi reveals he played injured in Liverpool thrashingby Freddie Taylor17 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveShkodran Mustafi has revealed he played through injury for Arsenal last season.The German endured a terrible night in the 5-1 loss to Liverpool in December 2018, but he has revealed he wasn’t fit enough to play the game.”I had missed three weeks injured and then went into the game without training with the team because the coach needed me,” he said. “At half-time it was 4-1, I had a few bad moments and injured myself again. “Afterwards, I got a lot of negative comments from Arsenal fans on Instagram and Twitter, and articles were written in which I was harshly criticised.” About the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

BCs First Nations leaders suspect high rate of overdose deaths

first_imgVANCOUVER – First Nations leaders in British Columbia say they suspect the deadly opioid fentanyl is having a disproportionate impact on their communities but they can’t get the numbers to prove it.Grand Chief Edward John of the First Nations Summit said he’s been asking the First Nations Health Authority and other provincial authorities for the data since last fall but nothing has yet been delivered.“I don’t even know how to feel, we need to have that information and we shouldn’t wait to act,” he said.Over 900 people died in the province from illicit overdoses last year. John said although he doesn’t know what proportion of those who died are indigenous, he knows plenty of families and communities that have fallen victim to the crisis.“All I hear is the anecdotal information from communities where funerals are taking place,” he said “People are dying needlessly.”The First Nations Health Authority said it’s working with the BC Coroners Service to develop an approach to collect the data that would identify deceased individuals as aboriginal.Current data collected by the agencies is based on self-identification and must first be compared against the B.C. Ministry of Health’s First Nation client file, which includes data from the federal government.“We want to ensure that any publicly released aboriginal specific data is as accurate as possible,” said Dr. Shannon McDonald, deputy chief medical officer for the First Nations Health Authority, in an email statement.“Once the data matching is completed and there’s greater confidence in the numbers, it will be available for release,” she said, adding that numbers may not be available for a few weeks at least.In the meantime, the health authority said it’s addressing the overdose crisis by educating the public about the harmful potential of opioids and distributing naloxone, the overdose-reversing drug.More than 70 First Nations health centres have received naloxone kits and the health authority said it held over 110 public training sessions on how to use the kits last year.Despite these efforts to get ahead of the crisis, the Shuswap Nation Tribal Council declared a state of emergency after seeing too many deaths in its communities. The council represents a collection of First Nations bands in the B.C. Interior.Tribal Chief Wayne Christian said in the days leading up to the declaration in March, five band members were buried in the span of a week.“Any death is an emergency,” he said. “The grief and loss, compounded by the intergenerational trauma, people just said we have got to do something about this, enough is enough.”Christian said the council is using the declaration to draw attention to the issue and educate people of all ages about addictions and drug use.More people seem to be aware of the crisis now, he said, but the history of residential schools and abuse still leave many vulnerable to addiction and other health issues.Terry Teegee, tribal chief of the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council, said another problem rural and remote communities face is the proximity to health care services.He said the closest doctors for his people in the Takla Lake community are in Fort Saint James in north-central B.C., which he added is an area struggling to recruit and keep physicians. His people travel 5 1/2 hours to reach Prince George if they need a specialist, he said, or at times have to go even farther to Kamloops or Vancouver.“Just the distance is, I suppose, you could define it as a health detriment in terms of accessing proper health care,” Teegee said.There are 10 treatment programs with a total of 239 beds available to indigenous people in B.C. through the health authority, including one youth program. The health authority said some programs offer immediate treatment while others have a 10 to 12 week waiting list.If there is a shortfall for services, John said overdose data could help First Nations leaders advocate for better resources when it comes to health care and addictions treatment.Christian, who has worked with one of the addiction treatment programs, said even without data, there are many areas where health care can improve. He said there is a need for post-treatment services that prevent people from relapsing and for programs addressing the trauma that leads to addictions.“Addictions is a system. The person comes out of a family, and yeah you can treat the one individual, but it’s the whole family system that needs to be treated,” he said.Any data released can’t represent the effect overdose deaths are having on communities, he said.“The hard part for me, when people talk statistics … those numbers aren’t numbers to us, those are our relatives,” Christian said.— Follow @Givetash on Twitter.last_img read more

Skeptical Football Goatslingers Manning vs Messi And The Andrew Luck Experiment

In last week’s column, I pointed out the importance of teams’ early records when trying to predict their playoff fates. This prompted a few skeptical tweets, like so:This tweeter is obviously right. The first few games of the season are predictive in part because losing games makes it harder to make the playoffs, and in part because they tell us something about the strength of the teams that lost them.That said, “Correlation is not causation” is what I like to call The Hammer to end arguments against all kinds of statistical findings. People use it to bash anything, but it’s blunt and dangerous.1Every time someone uses The Hammer on me, a puppy loses its wings.The artist and writer Randall Munroe took on The Hammer in xkcd:In the alt text of that comic, he hits the nail on the head: “Correlation doesn’t imply causation, but it does waggle its eyebrows suggestively and gesture furtively while mouthing ‘look over there.’”Let’s break down an example2Rookie Quarterback Watch has pretty much devolved into “How Bad Will the QBs Ahead of Rookie QBs Get Before the Rookie QBs Get to Start?” Watch.: Last week I observed that quarterbacks who (A) start more games in their rookie seasons (B) tend to have better careers. What does this observation imply?There are several possibilities:Starting rookies causes them to have better careers (A causes B).The types of rookies who are likely to have better careers are more likely to earn a rookie starting spot (B causes A).Rookies who are drafted higher are more likely to get starts, and are also more likely to have better careers (something else — call it C — causes both A and B).This is all just a coincidence and we should go home.Some combination of the above.That covers a lot of bases, but by making the observation, Nos. 1 through 3 become more likely than they were before. In this case, it’s fairly easy to establish that the relationship between A and B (rookie starts and non-rookie career AV) exists even when controlling for C (draft position).Following the observation that A and B are correlated, basically any possible state of the universe in which A and B are causally related has become more likely. For a Bayesian, determining which possibilities have seen their likelihood change the most involves consulting his prior beliefs, establishing which possibilities were the most likely before his new observation, and how likely the observation would be if each possibility were true. This leads to an updated set of beliefs about the likelihood of each scenario, which becomes the baseline for evaluating new observations, and so on.Charitably, “correlation ≠ causation” itself is a kind of limited Bayesian analysis. When people use it, they often mean simply that the “A causes B” scenario still doesn’t seem very likely to them, and thus they think other explanations are more likely. This is the case for most popular statistics examples, like the fact that lemon imports correlate negatively with highway fatality. That lemons are somehow preventing accidents is obviously ridiculous, so it doesn’t matter how strong the correlation is: It’s either a coincidence or we’re going to need other explanations.3I should note that for a true Bayesian, the odds that lemon imports actually do reduce highway fatality has still increased on the margins.But the idea that rookies playing could help them develop is not ridiculous — it’s highly debatable. After observing the relationship between rookie QB starts and career success (plus controlling for draft position), I must conclude that playing rookies is more likely to be good for their careers than I thought before, barring any other evidence. But that doesn’t mean it’s true. The alternative (or concurrent) explanation is also plausible: If coaches are good at determining which rookie QBs are actually good, and then tend to start the better ones, it’s still possible that starting them has a neutral (or even negative) effect on their careers individually. Regardless of which explanation is true, the observation remains the same: a rookie QB getting the start is good news for his prospects.Charts of the weekAaron Rodgers had his ups and downs against the Jets last week:I jest, of course. Rodgers brilliantly brought the Packers back from a 21-3 hole, but the comeback was complete by the end of the third quarter.This was Rodgers’s first-ever win after being down 15 points or more4I picked this number because it’s the smallest margin which Rodgers has never overcome, but as a separate and interesting point, I’ve found that 15-16 point margins, while technically “two scores” because they can be reached with two touchdowns plus two point conversions, actually act more like three score margins (17) than two score margins (14). against an opponent — though it was only his 12th opportunity. Here’s how he stacks up against other QBs since 2001 in comparable situations:Whoa, Peyton Manning! Forget Rodgers, Manning is the story here. But, it’s only 10 wins. Crazy things happen right? Let’s widen the scope, taking a look at all games in which a player’s team trailed by eight or more points, rather than just 15 or more:Peyton Manning is a practically Messi-esque outlier, complete with his own Cristiano Ronaldo to keep him company.Goatslinger of the weekThis was a tough week for gunslingers, as QBs who threw interceptions went 1-14, most of those games weren’t that close, and many of the interceptions were terrible. (Our nominal winner: Matt Ryan, whose three interceptions were at least all thrown downfield while his team was trailing.)So I’ve invented a new (hopefully temporary) award of ignominy: the Goatslinger.Andrew Luck, last week’s Gunslinger, is a contender for Goatslinger this week. With just 5:15 left, up seven against the Philadelphia Eagles, and already in field goal range, he threw an interception to Malcolm Jenkins. Plays like that give gamblers a bad name!But the top Goatslinger was Colin Kaepernick for his amazing effort to throw away San Francisco’s win against Chicago. He managed four turnovers (three interceptions and a fumble), three of them with his team up, including the interception up 20-14 in the fourth quarter that led to Chicago’s game-deciding touchdown.Twitter question of the week, Part 1I had two interesting questions on Twitter this week related to the timing and length of drives. First up:The answer is essentially “none,” or that there ends up being even less scoring in these scenarios. But the question is deceptively interesting. It’s also a fun vehicle for exploring the relationship between turnover rates and scoring/touchdown rates.In general, teams score more per drive when they are behind, but are also more likely to turn the ball over. I’ve broken down drives by quarter and point margin (tied, up or down 1-3 points, 4-7 points, 8-14 points, and 15 points or more) and compared how often the drives resulted in touchdowns to how often they resulted in turnovers.5To pre-empt a question I will almost certainly get despite this attempt to pre-empt it: Yes, obviously a lot more can happen on drives than just touchdowns or turnovers. For example, drives that end in field goal attempts count as neither, even though they may lead to points. This matters in situations where there’s no time for a touchdown, or where a team only cares about the three points. But we’ve excluded a lot of those situations by filtering out the last two minutes of each half. It’s also possible to do the same analysis on a points-per-drive, or even “expected points added” basis, but the results are similar. Considering the implications are the same, I prefer the symmetry and ease of interpreting touchdowns vs. turnovers. This gives us a sense of the trade-off between the two.Think of a drive when the game is tied in the first quarter as a kind of baseline: If a team starts at least 70 yards out, 15.5 percent of such drives will end in TDs, and 12.5 percent will end in turnovers. Compare that to the situation where teams are most aggressive: when they’re down 8-14 points in the fourth quarter. In those scenarios they score touchdowns 21.2 percent of the time and turn it over at a 27.5 percent clip.As teams play more aggressively, their chances of scoring go up, but so do their chances of turning the ball over. You can think of the ratio between these chances as the “price” of marginal scoring. For example, increasing your chances of scoring a touchdown by 1 percent requires increasing your chances of turning the ball over by up to 2 percent.6I should note that this exchange rate is likely skewed a little by the fact that worse teams tend to be behind more. I’m working on deskewing this to get a more exact comparison for a future project. In some situations, that’s a price you’re willing to pay (such as when you’re behind and stalled drives are pretty much just as bad), and in some it’s not.Understanding this trade-off is useful in analyzing a whole range of things in football, and my study of it is ongoing. But in the meantime, we can use our immediate findings to look at the situations our tweeter asked about and see what’s going on there.Before the half, it’s apparent that teams are extremely willing to settle for the points they have. With between one and two minutes on the clock in the second quarter, teams score touchdowns on 7 percent of their drives and turn the ball over on 12.9 percent. These are both lower than our baseline, so they’re definitely being conservative. It’s unclear what effect more aggression would have.With between one and two minutes on the clock at the end of the fourth quarter in games separated by between four and eight points, teams score touchdowns on 15.3 percent of drives, and turn the ball over on 42.1 percent of them. This is interesting because they spend a large number of turnovers on a completely average number of touchdowns. I think this reflects time pressure, but it could also suggest that true last-ditch “prevent” defenses may be pretty effective.Twitter question of the week, Part 2The simple answer is: Absolutely, a drive that eats up clock is valuable — when a team is ahead and wants to shorten the game. But shortening the game can also be useful when one team is a lot worse than the other.Imagine trading 100 drives with a team led by Peyton Manning, the Chiefs’ opponent in Week 2. Manning scores more per drive than anyone, and his accumulated points scored over 100 of them would be impossible for all but the best teams to overcome. Say the difference between your team and Manning’s was that Manning’s was one point per drive better — in a 100-drive game, your team would have to run 100 points above expectation to have a fighting chance. Statistically, that’s virtually impossible.7A team’s standard deviation on points scored over 100 drives is only 10 times the standard deviation of points scored for a single drive, so it can’t be more than 35, which would make a 100-point swing a three-standard-deviation event.But if each team got only one drive, yours would win every time it scored and Manning’s didn’t. That’s orders of magnitude more likely.This was pretty much exactly what happened with the Chiefs against the Broncos. The Chiefs had two extremely long drives in the second half: The first came at the start of the third quarter, lasted 10 minutes, and ended with a missed 37-yard field goal. The second came at the start of the fourth quarter, lasted 7:42, and ended with a Chiefs TD that drew them within four and set up a potential game-winning drive after Manning failed to score. As a result, Manning had only two meaningful possessions in the entire second half. Down 11 points, the Chiefs needed to score twice in their three possessions and have Denver score none in their two to win. Given the circumstances, those aren’t terrible odds.But let’s focus on their second drive at the very beginning of the fourth. It’s extremely risky to draw up a drive that lasts that long when down 11, as the end of the game quickly approaches. But leaving that aside, they did score a TD in a supposedly back-breaking fashion. Are such TDs any more valuable than regular TDs in similar situations?Using play-by-play data from ESPN, I looked back at all touchdown-scoring drives starting in the third quarter8I excluded the fourth quarter to minimize end-of-game effect. since 2001 in which a team was down 11-13 points at the start. I was kind of surprised by the results:The sample sizes on these aren’t very big (it’s only 107 cases total, and the most likely drive is right around the middle), but teams have won nine of 19 cases (47 percent) in which their scoring drives lasted longer than three minutes. That’s a pretty big number for being down, and it’s way higher than the 20 percent teams won after scoring on more normal drives. Why and if that’s significant, I don’t know, but it certainly leaves open the possibility that long drives like that may indicate/affect something larger.The Hacker Gods read FiveThirtyEightAs we all know, the Hacker Gods — who probably created this universe, by accident, while simulating a fourth-dimensional supernova — obviously read FiveThirtyEight. Last week they appeared to enjoy bolstering my analysis of Philip Rivers, but this week they are trying to undo me.Aaron Rodgers, whom I previously criticized for playing too conservatively (especially when behind), somehow brought the Packers back from 18 down against the Jets, earning the first 15+ point comeback victory of his career.Last week I talked up the majesty of gambling even if it risks an interception, but in Week 2 quarterbacks who threw one or more interceptions went 1-14.The only INT-throwing QB to win was Nick Foles against the Colts, but he won in part because inaugural Gunslinger of the Week Andrew Luck basically gave the game away by throwing his own INT with his team up seven and in field goal range in the fourth (suffice to say, that is a terrible spot to gamble).Experimental chart of the weekInspired by the Aaron Rodgers comeback, I asked on Twitter who people would want leading their team if it was down 15 or more points. Andrew Luck won the straw poll by a landslide with 47 percent of the votes, versus 20 percent for Peyton Manning. (Turnout was poor.9Only 15 votes total.)From the Charts of the Week above, this might seem pretty silly. For the most part, it is: Manning has won a higher percentage of games in which he has been down by 15 points than Luck, over a lot more games, even though it seems Luck has been on a tear for a couple of years. Impressive, but Manning has been down 15 much less often than Luck.This chart plots the percentage of 15-point comeback opportunities won vs. how often those opportunities have come up. I’ve also represented the total number of games, the number of comeback opportunities, and the number of successful comebacks as concentric circles, and plotted like so:Manning is even more impressive relative to Brady/Rodgers, but Luck managing to win in 3 of just 13 tries despite being on a team that ends up in that spot 36 percent of the time isn’t too shabby (the other data point near Luck at 20 percent is Matthew Stafford). If he can keep that up for another decade or so, he might just be a worthy successor to Manning.Most empirically significant game of Week 3If I could only watch one game, obviously it would be the Broncos/Seahawks Super Bowl rematch. But there is probably nothing that could happen in that game that would surprise me.Minnesota at New Orleans, on the other hand, holds some mystery. It may have even more empirical effect on Peyton Manning’s legacy than Manning’s own game: Every game that Matt Cassel bombs is more evidence that Bill Belichick has more to do with Tom Brady’s success than Tom Brady (because then it’s more likely that Cassel’s/Brady’s success in New England was because of Belichick), that Randy Moss is likely responsible for much of Brady’s (and Cassel’s) statistical accomplishment, and thus that Peyton Manning is the greatest quarterback of this generation.Charts by Reuben Fischer-BaumCORRECTION (Sept. 18, 1:50 p.m.): This article originally misstated the time and recipient of Andrew Luck’s interception in the Colts’ game against the Eagles. Luck threw the interception with 5:15, not 5:32, left in the fourth quarter and Malcolm Jenkins, not Rahim Moore, intercepted it. read more

Gerrard hammers defenders after horror show in Russia

first_imgRangers Football Club manager Steven Gerrard has hammered his team’s defenders after their horror outing against Spartak Moscow on Thursday.The Gers took the lead three times in Moscow, but a woeful second-half display handed them their first UEFA Europa League defeat of the season.The Scottish Premiership club were on a high when first-half strikes from Glenn Middleton, Daniel Candeias and an own-goal from Roman Eremenko gave them a 3-2 advantage.But shocking defensive lapses, especially in the second half, allowed Spartak to seize control for a 4-3 win, as they blew Group G wide open.Gerrard’s side seat third in their group behind Spartak and Villarreal, but host the Spanish club on match day 5 as they look to secure qualification for the second round.However, the former Liverpool youth team coach refused to spare his ropey rear-guard and knows more lamentable defending in their next two group games will cost them any shot at the last 32.Steven Gerrard, Michael OwenOwen reveals why Liverpool didn’t offer Gerrard a new contract Manuel R. Medina – September 6, 2019 According to Owen, the Reds wanted to sell Gerrard two years before he left the club and that’s why they didn’t offer him a contract renewal.He said, according to Express: “I’m very disappointed with the result. You saw two sides of our performance tonight. We attacked very well and were dangerous and countered bravely. We got our rewards and had control at half-time.“However, football is about levels and if you don’t do the basics well enough and defend properly, then high-level teams will normally punish you and that was the case here.“People who have had a lot of praise and who did really well to get us to this stage just didn’t do the basics well enough.“Normally, to come here and score three goals you get a result, but I’m bitterly disappointed with how we defended.”last_img read more

Tottenham hope to have Son back against Watford

first_imgEnglish side have had to endure a tough period following their second exit from a cup competition in the space of four days.The London side is set to have a relief as Son Heung-Min is believed to likely return for their midweek clash with Watford.Son has missed the last three games while being on international duty with South Korea at the Asian Cup, but their surprise quarter-final exit to Qatar means he is back in the fold earlier than expected.“On Sunday we were with him on the training ground in the morning,” boss Mauricio Pochettino SportBT.“He’s so tired, he played three games. Very tough games.“Of course not too much energy on Sunday, but we hope he’ll be available and ready on Wednesday to help the team.”What to expect from Watford V Arsenal? Taimoor Khan – September 8, 2019 Arsenal are set to take on Watford this weekend and the game is definitely going to be quite a peculiar contest between two sides…Pochettino says he has moved on from the defeats and has shifted his focus on a top four finish in the Premier league as well as advancing in the UEFA champions league.“Of course I am disappointed because, after Thursday and today again, out of two competitions – you feel disappointed. You can’t feel anything different,” Pochettino said.“But now we have to be positive. We are still in two competitions, in a good position in the Premier League and the Champions League is a massive motivation for the whole club. We have to be strong.“Now the realistic targets are trying to be in the top four, try and be close to Manchester City and Liverpool and reduce the gap.“To be a contender is always difficult for us. (Top four) is realistic.“Another is to try and beat (Borussia) Dortmund and be in the next round of the Champions League. That is tough.”last_img read more